The Temptation of AA Bronson

AA Bronson
September 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014

AA Bronson

We Are the Revolution, 2011

Three-color serigraph on paper, diamonds, glass, sand
10 serigraphs

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

AA Bronson & Scott Treleaven
Cabine, 2008
Cotton, rayon, wood, gold leaf

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

AA Bronson & Scott Treleaven 
Cabine, 2008
Cotton, rayon, wood, gold leaf

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

AA Bronson & Scott Treleaven 
Cabine, 2008
Cotton, rayon, wood, gold leaf

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Exhibition view

The Temptation of AA Bronson, 2014

Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Exhibition view

The Temptation of AA Bronson, 2014

Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

AA Bronson

The Hanged Man, 2002 (left)

Lambda color photographs rear-mounted to Plexiglas

 

K8 Hardy
Untitled (Jock Strap Dress), 2013
Cotton, elastic (new and used jock straps)

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Marina Abramovic
Transitory Objects: Bed(s) For Human Use, 2012

Wood, black quartz crystals, headphones, pillows

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

The Temptation of AA Bronson

AA Bronson
Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam
September 5, 2013 – January 5, 2014
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AA Bronson (b. 1946, Vancouver) is both artist and curator, subject and object, in this hybrid project that includes his recent solo work, his collaborations with younger artists, and works by friends, both queer and not. Also included are two of his curatorial projects: Queer Zines, incorporating more than 100 queer zines from the punk era until today; and Ancestors, a personal archive of books, editions, and ephemera that form a fragmentary and incoherent historical underpinning to the overall project.

 

Themes of body, spirit, sex, religion, community, death, ritual, and magic collide throughout The Temptation of AA Bronson in sigils, crystals, mirrors, nudity, and bodily fluids. Moving up through the old school rooms of Witte de With, the style of exhibition moves back in time: the white cube gives way to the immersive environment of the surrealist exhibition, and to the cabinet of curiosities, to finally arrive at the threshold of magic: the phantasm of images, smells, sounds, and action that contains the potential for healing.

 

The exhibition features a new commission by AA Bronson and Michael Bühler-Rose, The City of Nine Gates, consisting of two large cubes, each containing the remains of a performance. Bronson’s Invocation of the Queer Spirits (Rotterdam) will be enacted privately by a small group of invited participants at midnight prior to the opening. Bühler-Rose’s ritual, Invocation by Fire, is open to the public a few hours later at dawn.

 

A new iteration of Marina Abramović’s major installation Transitory Objects: Beds for Human and Spirit Use invites visitors to don white laboratory coats and earphones, and to lie down on wooden tables to experience the healing energy of crystals, which she calls “the most simplified computers of the planet.” Abramović says: “If you put in any impulse—that’s how you get digital watches—the impulse never leaves the crystal. […] They’re regenerators.”

 

During the opening, The Temptation of AA Bronson was baptized with a confusion of simultaneous and continuous performances by Chrysanne Stathacos, Michael Dudeck, Nils Bech, Sands Murray-Wassink, and Sébastien Lambeaux.

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