SHORT BIG DRAMA

Angela Bulloch
January 21 – April 9, 2012

Gang of Four Blue: Print No. 11, 2004 (front left)

Gang of Four Yellow: Print No. 12, 2004 (front right)

Gang of Four Brown: Print No. 13, 2004/2012 (center)

Gang of Four Red: Print No. 14, 2004 (back left)

Gang of Four Mixed: Print No. 15, 2004 (back right)

Each work: 4 DMX boxes, 1 black box module, photographic print on transparent plastic, diffusion foil, 2 sheets of glass, frame

 

Gang of Four 16: Print No. 16, 2004 (back center)

16 DMX boxes, 1 black box module, photographic print on transparent plastic, diffusion foil, 2 sheets of glass, frame

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Gang of Four Blue: Print No. 11, 2004 (front left)

Gang of Four Yellow: Print No. 12, 2004 (front right)

Gang of Four Brown: Print No. 13, 2004/2012 (center)

Gang of Four Red: Print No. 14, 2004 (back left)

Gang of Four Mixed: Print No. 15, 2004 (back right)

Each work: 4 DMX boxes, 1 black box module, photographic print on transparent plastic, diffusion foil, 2 sheets of glass, frame

 

Gang of Four 16: Print No. 16, 2004 (back center)

16 DMX boxes, 1 black box module, photographic print on transparent plastic, diffusion foil, 2 sheets of glass, frame

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Fundamental Discord: 16, 2005

16 DMS boxes (spaced out in a grid on the floor), 1 black box module placed loosely alongside the arrangement, all with 250 cm cables

Duration: 8 minutes, 20 seconds

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Fundamental Discord: 16, 2005

16 DMS boxes (spaced out in a grid on the floor), 1 black box module placed loosely alongside the arrangement, all with 250 cm cables

Duration: 8 minutes, 20 seconds

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Vanishing Waiting Room, 2008

6 polished stainless steel tubes, 2 one-way mirrors, 2 two-way mirrors, yellow MDF roof, yellow bench, internal lightsource, lime-green electroluminescent wire

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Vanishing Waiting Room, 2008

6 polished stainless steel tubes, 2 one-way mirrors, 2 two-way mirrors, yellow MDF roof, yellow bench, internal lightsource, lime-green electroluminescent wire

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Vanishing Waiting Room, 2008

6 polished stainless steel tubes, 2 one-way mirrors, 2 two-way mirrors, yellow MDF roof, yellow bench, internal lightsource, lime-green electroluminescent wire

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Electric Wire Drawing: P.S. Tetrahedron (hanging, no points), 2012 (top)

Electric Wire Drawing: P.S. Hexahedron (hanging, no points), 2012 (center)

Electric Wire Drawing: P.S. Dodecahedron (hanging, no points), 2008 (bottom)

All works: wire frame, bright white electroluminescent cable, inverter

 

The sculptural drawings are made of electroluminescent wire. The drawn line acquires a three-dimensional presence, the materiality of which is transformed into a purely visual phenomenon. The luminous wire demarcates the outline of each shape and creates the illusion of solid volumes, where the viewer knows that there is nothing but mere stretched out lines. The series comprises five different platonic forms, which form the core structure of each object.

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

General Wall of Rules, 1996

Installation, printed paper, white frame, plexiglass panels

 

Angela Bulloch’s work spans many media, but they all manifest her interest in systems, patterns and rules, as well as her preoccupation with the history of shapes and human interaction with them. The Rules Series, begun in 1992, consists of a continuously growing collection of rules, regulations, and norms. 

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

General Wall of Rules, 1996

Installation, printed paper, white frame, plexiglass panels

 

Angela Bulloch’s work spans many media, but they all manifest her interest in systems, patterns and rules, as well as her preoccupation with the history of shapes and human interaction with them. The Rules Series, begun in 1992, consists of a continuously growing collection of rules, regulations, and norms. 

 

Contructostrato Drawing Machine: Red, 2011 (detail; front)

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

General Wall of Rules, 1996 (left)

Installation, printed paper, white frame, plexiglass panels

 

Angela Bulloch’s work spans many media, but they all manifest her interest in systems, patterns and rules, as well as her preoccupation with the history of shapes and human interaction with them. The Rules Series, begun in 1992, consists of a continuously growing collection of rules, regulations, and norms. 

 

Contructostrato Drawing Machine: Red, 2011 (detail; center)

 

Blue Amplitude & Wallace, 2011 (right)

Drawing Machine, ink (blue), MacBook Pro, Genelec speaker

Sound piece 'Wallace' by Ken Ueno

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Blue Amplitude & Wallace, 2011 (left)

Drawing Machine, ink (blue), MacBook Pro, Genelec speaker

Sound piece 'Wallace' by Ken Ueno

 

Constructostrato Drawing Machine: Red, 2011 (right)

Bench to activate drawing machine, ink, metal rails and electronic motor, paper

 

Each of the Drawing Machine works consists of a wall mounted with x/y plotters that operate through a system of electric motors an pulleys. The viewer usually triggers the drawing machine via movement- or sound-responsive sensors or pressure switches in the upholstery of the viewing bench. 

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

WikiLeaks - Kaupthing Claims, 2011

The wall painting uses a statement by WikiLeaks' founder and information activist Julian Assange, as well as leaked data relating to the repayments made to customers following the collapse of Iceland's Icebank. This data portrait resembles a graphical explosion - a mass of names and numbers flaring from a spherical core.

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

BODYSPACEMOTIONTHINGS, 2011 (left)

It was a sensation in the 70s when the Tate was forced to close a new exhibit, just four days after it was opened, when it was almost wrecked by an overly exuberant public. Nearly 40 years on, Robert Morris’s Bodyspacemotionthings has lost none of its potential for danger after clocking up a string of casualties during a special reappearance at Tate Modern in the summer of 2012. The artwork, in which participants are invited to negotiate seesaws, a tightrope and other obstacles, left 23 people needing first aid in just over week.

 

Novembergruppe, 2011 (center)

In a letter from 1919, artists, sculptors and architects "of the new spirit" are called to join the revolutionary November Group. The letter is followed by the group's rules and charter.

 

Rules for an Understanding of Conceptual Art, 2009 (detail; right)

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

The International Standard: ISO 216, 2009

The international paper size standard, ISO 216, is based on the German DIN 476 standard for paper sizes. ISO paper sizes are all based on a single aspect ratio of square root of 2, or approximately 1:1.4142. The main advantage of this system is its scaling: if a sheet with an aspect ratio of √2 is divided into two equal halves parallel to its shortest sides, then the halves will again have an aspect ratio of √2. 

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Rules for an Understanding of Conceptual Art, 2009

 

Like the entire Rules Series, the actual work consists of an A4 sheet with the Rules text, accompanied by a certificate. The Rules text can be reproduced in any medium or form.

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

Rules for an Understanding of Conceptual Art, 2009 (detail; left)

Cosa Nostra, 2011 (detail; back)

 

Photo © Bob Goedewaagen

SHORT BIG DRAMA

Angela Bulloch
Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam
January 21 – April 9, 2012
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There is more than meets the eye to Angela Bulloch’s work. Her solo exhibition SHORT BIG DRAMA at Witte de With, Center for Contemporary Art plays with this red herring – the illusion of simplicity – and highlights the theatricality of Bulloch’s practice. Focusing on three types of works – namely her monumental wall paintings, colorful pixel installations and interactive drawing machines – SHORT BIG DRAMA presents a selection of existing works together with specially commissioned new pieces.

 

In this exhibition, contradiction takes center-stage and reveals the inherent beauty of Bulloch’s complex artworks. Playing with the nature of drama, whether epic or mundane, big or short, the project adapts the form of a play to structure a sequence of commissions and a new suite of works by the artist. For Witte de With, Bulloch interprets and manipulates earlier potentially clashing installations into a seemingly harmonious whole.

 

Bulloch adopts an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating references from a wide array of sources, be it history, film or music. In her wall paintings, specific references to artistic, political or social groups are deconstructed and graphically assembled. Through this process of détournement, the artist questions the informational status of an artwork, as well as the possibility of narrating history. Bulloch’s drawing machines are interactive pieces, triggered or altered by the engagement of visitors. In this way, her drawing machines explore the dialectic between technology and labor, making us conscious of our place, and that of others, within the gallery space. With her Pixel works, Bulloch ‘programs’ our experience of art by encoding specific references in the technical programming of her modular light and sound installations. Though the complexity of the workings behind these installations is invisible, a predefined experience of the work is imposed upon the viewer, thus challenging the viewer’s subjective input.

 

A common thread in Bulloch’s artistic practice is thus the manipulation of codes and a sense of control. Whether that code is music or text-based, the artist plays with and orchestrates our perception and experience of art. She proposes that this experience can be ‘subliminally programmed’ and her work stages that which is beyond our grasp.

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