ALL OF A TREMBLE

Anri Sala
October 8, 2016 – September 30, 2019
Teshima Seawall House
Benesse Art Site, Naoshima

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

All of a Tremble (Seawall), 2016 (at center)

Vintage wallpaper-printing roller, steel comb, mortar, electric motor and customized motion-control software

 

Installed on an outside wall, the vintage wallpaper-printing roller is combined with a steel comb to create a music box. Part of the wall has been covered with the pattern from the roller.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

All of a Tremble (Seawall), 2016 (detail)

Vintage wallpaper-printing roller, steel comb, mortar, electric motor and customized motion-control software

 

Installed on an outside wall, the vintage wallpaper-printing roller is combined with a steel comb to create a music box. Part of the wall has been covered with the pattern from the roller.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

All of a Tremble (Seawall), 2016 (detail)

Vintage wallpaper-printing roller, steel comb, mortar, electric motor and customized motion-control software

 

Installed on an outside wall, the vintage wallpaper-printing roller is combined with a steel comb to create a music box. Part of the wall has been covered with the pattern from the roller.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

Untitled (La Marbrée, La Prycka, La Branchiale, Le Planer/Teshima, Naoshima, Inujima), 2016
Ink, pastel, hand-colored etching on paper
 
In this series Untitled (map/species), Sala reworks maps of countries and geopolitical territories through manual manipulation, skewing and warping representations of land mass so that they fit within the boundaries of the found etchings of biological species with which they are exhibited.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

Untitled (La Marbrée, La Prycka, La Branchiale, Le Planer/Teshima, Naoshima, Inujima), 2016
Ink, pastel, hand-colored etching on paper
 
In this series Untitled (map/species), Sala reworks maps of countries and geopolitical territories through manual manipulation, skewing and warping representations of land mass so that they fit within the boundaries of the found etchings of biological species with which they are exhibited.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

Untitled (La Marbrée, La Prycka, La Branchiale, Le Planer/Teshima, Naoshima, Inujima), 2016
Ink, pastel, hand-colored etching on paper
 
In this series Untitled (map/species), Sala reworks maps of countries and geopolitical territories through manual manipulation, skewing and warping representations of land mass so that they fit within the boundaries of the found etchings of biological species with which they are exhibited.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

In-Between the Doldrums (Pac-Man), 2016

2 altered snare drums, loudspeaker parts, snare stands, drumsticks, soundtrack (stereo)

Duration 04:34 min (loop)

Composed by Anastasio Mitropoulos
Mixed by Olivier Goinard

 

This is the first work from Sala’s series of altered snare drums for which an original musical score was composed. Performed on electric guitar, its recording creates the vibrations that in turn, move the drumsticks. Interwoven with the sound of the drumsticks are brief sections of the composition, emanating from inside the drum.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

In-Between the Doldrums (Pac-Man), 2016

2 altered snare drums, loudspeaker parts, snare stands, drumsticks, soundtrack (stereo)

Duration 04:34 min (loop)

Composed by Anastasio Mitropoulos
Mixed by Olivier Goinard

 

This is the first work from Sala’s series of altered snare drums for which an original musical score was composed. Performed on electric guitar, its recording creates the vibrations that in turn, move the drumsticks. Interwoven with the sound of the drumsticks are brief sections of the composition, emanating from inside the drum.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

In-Between the Doldrums (Pac-Man), 2016

2 altered snare drums, loudspeaker parts, snare stands, drumsticks, soundtrack (stereo)

Duration 04:34 min (loop)

Composed by Anastasio Mitropoulos
Mixed by Olivier Goinard

 

This is the first work from Sala’s series of altered snare drums for which an original musical score was composed. Performed on electric guitar, its recording creates the vibrations that in turn, move the drumsticks. Interwoven with the sound of the drumsticks are brief sections of the composition, emanating from inside the drum.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

A Longer Sorrow, 2016

Video and sound installation

 

The work is a requiem for the end of dreams. It is a situation structured by a setup rather than a narrative. It is, in fact, more a succession of tinted situations, which are colored by moments of tension, gestures, and music that can make you feel. Its protagonist is the free jazz saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc. In the film, the musician’s improvisations build a cathedral of sound, imbued with a sense of mounting tension.

 

Photo © Naoharu Obayashi 

ALL OF A TREMBLE

Anri Sala
Benesse Art Site, Naoshima
October 8, 2016 – September 30, 2019
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Anri Sala’s installation entitled ALL OF A TREMBLE, conceived on occasion of receiving the 10th Benesse Prize, occupies the entire structure of the formerly abandoned teahouse. In the old house along the shore, his art work creates a complex interaction between his works and elements that appear to belong to the building. Thus deep green curtains open and close across the long glass enclosure, creating a changing space for the projection of A Longer Sorrow. The exhibition includes for the first time, an especially conceived glass structure around a central projection screen. The glass panels create a number of variant sound areas.

 

The rhythm of drums, the sound of music boxes, and different video footage of both an improvising saxophone and a shakuhachl (a Japanese bamboo flute) resonate in the building, giving the impression of the house as an organic entity, pulsing with life. The once-abandoned house is brought to life, inviting viewers to reflect on the displacement and lives of human beings as well as to physically experience “the meeting of two different worlds” - outside and inside, eastern and western, contrasting instruments, ocean and sky, the artificial and the natural, social and private. 

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