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Ceal Floyer
August 23 – October 18, 2009

Long Distance Diptych, 1993–2009

Slide, slide-projectors, projector table

Two slightly touching circles of light, mimicking a binocular viewfinder, are created by two slide projectors placed adjacent on a double projector table at some distance from the wall.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Works on paper, 2009

Ball pen, pen, pencil on paper

For years, Ceal Floyer collected the pieces of paper customers used to test pens at stationary shops. The selection and assembly of these pieces of paper (generally discarded) becomes a performative act of appropriation.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Works on paper, 2009 (detail)

Ball pen, pen, pencil on paper

For years, Ceal Floyer collected the pieces of paper customers used to test pens at stationary shops. The selection and assembly of these pieces of paper (generally discarded) becomes a performative act of appropriation.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Things, 2009

25 audio CDs, 25 CD players, amplifiers, cables, 50 speakers, wood

The tracks played are looped in their original length but emptied of all content except for the randomly appearing word “thing”. The plinth, a classical form of presentation and bearer of objects, becomes the body of resonance for the abstracted idea of a thing, in an environment where concrete things are materially absent.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Double Act, 2006

Photographic gobo, theater lamp

While the projection appears to be a spotlight shone on a curtain, it is actually a beam of light projecting the image of the curtain.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Stop Motion, 2008 (detail)

C-print covered with matt foil mounted on aluminium Dibond, 2 parts

Together the two parts make up the well-known 1936 image by the pioneer of stop-motion photography Harold Edgerton. By splitting the image in two, the artist confounds the observer’s expectations of cause and effect.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Stop Motion, 2008 (detail)

C-print covered with matt foil mounted on aluminium Dibond, 2 parts

Together the two parts make up the well-known 1936 image by the pioneer of stop-motion photography Harold Edgerton. By splitting the image in two, the artist confounds the observer’s expectations of cause and effect.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Title Variable: 5m 29cm, 2001–09 (left)
Site/title specific installation, black elastics and fixtures
The elastic taut is incrementally stretched to its full capacity across the whole length of the wall. Then the length of the remaining portion is subtracted from the original length. The result constitutes the title. 
 

Duck-Rabbit, 2009 (back)
Poster on aluminium Dibond
The work deals with an ironic examination of phenomena of perception. Floyer extends the famous duck-rabbit image Ludwig Wittgenstein described in his Philosophical Investigations (1953) with another figure – the Playboy Bunny.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Secret, 2009 (left)

Megaphones

The two objects appear to be in a hermetically closed conversation, mutually absorbing each other’s usually loud sounds. The title refers to this effectual silencing but also to their proximity that alludes less to amplification than to the ‘secret’ whispering of conspirators.

 

Wish You Were Here, 2008 (right)
Postcard holder
This readymade works with the sentimental cliché habitually written on the back of postcards. This often unthinkingly repeated phrase corresponds with the object, an empty display rack that complains of its missing "content". 

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

Secret, 2009 

Megaphones

The two objects appear to be in a hermetically closed conversation, mutually absorbing each other’s usually loud sounds. The title refers to this effectual silencing but also to their proximity that alludes less to amplification than to the ‘secret’ whispering of conspirators.

 

Photo © Uwe Walter

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Ceal Floyer
KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin
August 23 – October 18, 2009
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Ceal Floyer’s practice includes works on paper, photographs, sound works, films and readymades. Words, proverbs and allegories often constitute her points of departure. Ceal Floyer’s works typically require an attentive and engaged viewing. Precise and evocative, Floyer’s minimal installations, objects and films challenge our perception. Analytically she lays open the structural character of things, revealing their quiet poeticism.

 

For her first comprehensive solo exhibition in Germany, Ceal Floyer created a number of new works. 

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