Lota

Matti Braun
March 17 – April 21, 2007

Untitled, 2007, (left)

Concrete, metal, plastic

A degree of imperfection is present in the small free standing wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the gallery space. Its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern of the textiles on the walls. 

 

Untitled, 2007 (right)

Handpainted cotton, metal strap

The textile reaches from ceiling to floor. Its bold geometric pattern, consisting in triangles, is kept in black and white. On a second view the pattern proves not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example.

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Handpainted cotton, metal strap

The textile reaches from ceiling to floor. Its bold geometric pattern, consisting in triangles, is kept in black and white. On a second view the pattern proves not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example. 

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007 (left, detail)

Untitled, 2007, (wall, back)

Both works: Handpainted cotton, metal strap

The two textiles reach from ceiling to floor. Their bold geometric patterns are kept in black and white—one consisting of vertical lines and the other of triangles. On a second view the patterns prove not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example. 

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007, (front)

Concrete, metal, plastic

A degree of imperfection is present in the small free standing wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the gallery space. Its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern of the textiles on the walls. 

 

Untitled, 2007 (back)

Handpainted cotton, metal strap

The textile reaches from ceiling to floor. Its bold geometric pattern, consisting in vertical lines, is kept in black and white. On a second view the pattern proves not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007, (front)

Concrete, metal, plastic

A degree of imperfection is present in the small free standing wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the gallery space. Its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern of the textiles on the walls. 

 

Untitled, 2007 (wall, detail)

Handpainted cotton, metal strap

The textile reaches from ceiling to floor. Its bold geometric pattern, consisting in vertical lines, is kept in black and white. On a second view the pattern proves not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007, (detail)

Concrete, metal, plastic

A degree of imperfection is present in the small free standing wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the gallery space. Its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern of the textiles on the walls. 

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Concrete, metal, plastic

A degree of imperfection is present in the small free standing wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the gallery space. Its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern of the textiles on the walls. 

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

The Alien (London), 2007
Inkjetprint on paper

A series of photographs documents the most recent performance of a theatre play by the artist entitled The Alien. It is based on a script written in 1967 by Satyajit Ray, and tells the story of an extra terrestrial being, the alien, who crash lands into a lotus pond close to a small Bengali village. Each photograph presents a total view of the set, that is kept in black and white and mainly consists of vertical stripes, framed by large, printed, symmetrically arranged textiles, related to the ones in the main space of the gallery.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Untitled, 2007

Untitled, 2007

All works: Glass

The mouth-blown spherical glass bowls oscillate between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Untitled, 2007

Untitled, 2007

All works: Glass

The mouth-blown spherical glass bowls oscillate between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Glass, appr. 13 x 23 x 23 cm

The mouth-blown spherical glass bowls oscillate between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Glass, appr. 11 x 17 x 17 cm

The mouth-blown spherical glass bowls oscillate between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Untitled, 2007

Glass, appr. 18 x 21 x 21 cm

The mouth-blown spherical glass bowls oscillate between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Lota

Matti Braun
March 17 – April 21, 2007
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Lota is the title of Matti Braun’s third solo exhibition at the gallery. The main space is dominated by a strict atmosphere created by two textiles reaching from the ceiling to the floor. Their bold geometric patterns are kept in black and white—one consisting of vertical lines and the other of triangles. On a second view the patterns prove not to be totally perfect, the width of each stripe varying slightly, for example. A degree of imperfection is also present in a small freestanding wall made out of reinforced concrete, the only object occupying the space, and its zigzag shape corresponds to the pattern on the textiles.

 

Braun shies away from literal illustration of the different historical sources with which he juggles and his work takes the shape of a strong and partially abstract visual language. Often the points of departure—an extraordinary personality or a peculiar instance of cultural displacement—is blurred along the process as he combines it with other lines of thought and the work gains an autonomous form. He often pursues the mutations that occur when traditions, which are unlikely to match, meet by chance.

 

The serial yet handmade quality characterizing the textiles is also found in the adjoining space where a row of hand-blown glass objects are presented. Made in different shades they are shaped like bubbles. Furthermore, a series of photographs documents the most recent performance of a theater play by Braun entitled The Alien. It is based on a script written in 1967 by Satyajit Ray and tells the story of an extraterrestrial being, the alien, who crash lands into a lotus pond close to a small Bengali village. As the alien causes confusion in the small village, the script points towards the conflicts that occur when change is imposed on a traditional way of living. The play was performed for the first time at Project Art Centre in Dublin in 2005. For each of the subsequent performances in Leiden, Bonn and London, a new cast was assembled and the script was translated into the local language. Each photograph presents a total view of the set, that is kept in black and white and mainly consists of vertical stripes, framed by large, printed, symmetrically arranged textiles, related to the ones in the main space of the gallery. However, it is left open to the viewer to trace conceptual relationships between the different elements of the exhibition.

 

A poster designed by Braun and featuring The National Design University in Ahmedabad accompanies the exhibition. Braun has explored the format of the poster in several of his previous works, and the ones he designs for his exhibitions always form an integrated part rather than a supplement.

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