Ceal Floyer

Ceal Floyer
October 14, 2016 – January 22, 2017

Today’s Special, 2009

Board, wood, chalk

This work plays on a misreading: If the apostrophe were to indicate an abbreviation of the verb ‘is’, the sign would mean ‘Today is special’. The back side reads ‘Tomorrow's another day’.

 

Bars, 2015

Powder coated steel

In a characteristic reversal of boundaries, the artist has installed bars generally found on the outside of buildings inside, effectively rendering the windows unusable and the bars without identifiable function.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Today’s Special, 2009 (back side)

Board, wood, chalk

 

Bars, 2015

Powder coated steel

In a characteristic reversal of boundaries, the artist has installed bars generally found on the outside of buildings inside, effectively rendering the windows unusable and the bars without identifiable function.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

From front to back:

 

Bucket, 1999

CD, portable CD player with a single, active audio speaker, black plastic bucket, electrical cable

An ordinary black plastic bucket emits the irregular sound of dripping water landing in its base, leading to a puzzling disparity between visual and acoustic perception.

 

Plumb Line, 2004

Metal plumb, line

A metal plumb and line hang from the ceiling in the middle of a room, thus stating a center point instead of giving help to building a surrounding wall.

 

Variation of a Door, 1995/2010

Light projection/installation, 35 mm metal mask slide, slide projector

A fine horizontal strip of light is projected onto the bottom of a door. The number of the slide projectors is equivalent to the number of doors in the exhibition, connecting public with private spaces.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Plumb Line, 2004

Metal plumb, line

A metal plumb and line hang from the ceiling in the middle of a room, thus stating a center point instead of giving help to building a surrounding wall.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Plumb Line, 2004

Metal plumb, line

A metal plumb and line hang from the ceiling in the middle of a room, thus stating a center point instead of giving help to building a surrounding wall.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Variation of a Door, 1995/2010

Light projection/installation, 35 mm metal mask slide, slide projector

A fine horizontal strip of light is projected onto the bottom of a door. The number of the slide projectors is equivalent to the number of doors in the exhibition, connecting public with private spaces.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Clockwise from front left:

 

Bucket, 1999

CD, portable CD player with a single, active audio speaker, black plastic bucket, electrical cable

An ordinary black plastic bucket emits the irregular sound of dripping water landing in its base, leading to a puzzling disparity between visual and acoustic perception.

 

Projection, 1997

Slide projection, slide, AV stand, projector

 

Solo, 2006

Microphone stand, hairbrush

The juxtaposition of objects intended for private and for public use draws attention to the usual separation of these two realms. The play with expectations and the misuse of technical equipment are continuous themes in Floyer’s work. 

 

Plumb Line, 2004

Metal plumb, line

A metal plumb and line hang from the ceiling in the middle of a room, thus stating a center point instead of giving help to building a surrounding wall.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Projection, 1997 (left)

Slide projection, slide, AV stand, projector

 

Solo, 2006 (right)

Microphone stand, hairbrush

The juxtaposition of objects intended for private and for public use draws attention to the usual separation of these two realms. The play with expectations and the misuse of technical equipment are continuous themes in Floyer’s work. 


Photo © Tony Prikryl

Projection, 1997

Slide projection, slide, AV stand, projector


Photo © Tony Prikryl

Projection, 1997

Slide projection, slide, AV stand, projector


Photo © Tony Prikryl

Solo, 2006

Microphone stand, hairbrush

The juxtaposition of objects intended for private and for public use draws attention to the usual separation of these two realms. The play with expectations and the misuse of technical equipment are continuous themes in Floyer’s work. 


Photo © Tony Prikryl

Solo, 2006 (detail)

Microphone stand, hairbrush

The juxtaposition of objects intended for private and for public use draws attention to the usual separation of these two realms. The play with expectations and the misuse of technical equipment are continuous themes in Floyer’s work. 


Photo © Tony Prikryl

Untitled Installation (Dotted Line), 1993–2014 (detail)

Letraset (adhesive vinyl), 35 mm slide, slide viewer, plinth

The broken line resembles “cut-here” markings on a sheet of paper. The photographic image of scissors activates the unexplained line running along the space: It can now be read as a sign undermining the stability of the architecture. 

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Untitled Installation (Dotted Line), 1993–2014 (detail)

Letraset (adhesive vinyl), 35 mm slide, slide viewer, plinth

The broken line resembles “cut-here” markings on a sheet of paper. The photographic image of scissors activates the unexplained line running along the space: It can now be read as a sign undermining the stability of the architecture. 

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Untitled Installation (Dotted Line), 1993–2014 (detail)

Letraset (adhesive vinyl), 35 mm slide, slide viewer, plinth

The broken line resembles “cut-here” markings on a sheet of paper. The photographic image of scissors activates the unexplained line running along the space: It can now be read as a sign undermining the stability of the architecture. 

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Mousehole, 1994
Installation, ink on DIN A4 paper

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Untitled Credit Roll (CMIYC), 2013

Video projection

Duration 04:47 min (looped)

The video shows the credits from a movie, but the titles and names have been blurred. This act of rendering unknowable is reminiscent of the expunging of secrets from declassified materials, but the artist reverses the process not just visually but also by deleting the names of people seeking credit. 

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Garbage Bag, 1996

Black plastic garbage bag, air, twist tie

Tied shut and apparently full, a garbage bag is placed close to a doorway. It is filled with air.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Welcome, 2011

Ready-made welcome mat

The ready-made welcome mat is placed at the entrance door to the exhibition space but rotated by 180°, thus welcoming the visitors as they are leaving the exhibition.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Welcome, 2011

Ready-made welcome mat

The ready-made welcome mat is placed at the entrance door to the exhibition space but rotated by 180°, thus welcoming the visitors as they are leaving the exhibition.

 

Photo © Tony Prikryl

Ceal Floyer

Ceal Floyer
Aspen Art Museum
October 14, 2016 – January 22, 2017
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The Aspen Art Museum is pleased to present the second major US solo exhibition of the work of critically acclaimed British artist Ceal Floyer. The exhibition will feature a curatorial selection of thirteen works spanning the years 1993–2015, curated by AAM Nancy and Bob Magoon CEO and Director Heidi Zuckerman. 

 

Predominantly working in the media of film and installation, Floyer’s artistic practice addresses notions of the uncanny, the humorous, and the absurd through deceptively simple means, yet to deeply nuanced effect. She often plays with the conceptual distance between recognizable everyday objects and their linguistic counterparts, as well as other clever aspects of common daily associations. Floyer is able to create scenarios and situations that encourage a veritable double take on the part of the viewer, revealing the poetry inherent in the everyday and calling attention to the relationship between how we hear to what we see. In her work Door (1995), for example, a slide projector is aimed at the bottom of a door to give the appearance of light coming from the other side, allowing both the apprehension of an easily discovered trope, yet evocative of imaginative possibilities or even an unknown presence. In the work Solo (2006), she playfully deploys a hairbrush—the universally ageless stand-in for a microphone for lip-synching, mirror pop, and rock stars around the globe—installed on a professional stage-performance-ready microphone stand. Solo humorously collapses the distance between each objects’ real roles in different worlds while also acknowledging a conflated realm in which intimate activity acknowledges public performance and private fantasy becomes shared reality. 

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