Temporama

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
June 20 – August 9, 2015

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1986/2015 (back right)
Column and surface with carpet

Placed in front of the rectangular shape, the column covered in the same material creates the optical effect of partially disappearing or fusing. Perhaps in reference to the traditional distinctions between sculpture and painting (and its reprise in modernism of three-dimensionality vs. flatness), the dynamic contrasts the sculptural presence of the columnar shape with the two-dimensionality of the wall.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled, 1987/2015 (foreground)

Plastic red buckets and white architect lamps
For this exhibition, the artist recreated works from her early years. The unlikely pairing of desk lamps and plastic buckets creates a grouping of luminous objects. Characteristic of her continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present.
 

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015 (middleground)

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1986/2015 (back right)
Column and surface with carpet

Placed in front of the rectangular shape, the column covered in the same material creates the optical effect of partially disappearing or fusing. Perhaps in reference to the traditional distinctions between sculpture and painting (and its reprise in modernism of three-dimensionality vs. flatness), the dynamic contrasts the sculptural presence of the columnar shape with the two-dimensionality of the wall.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1987/2015 (background)
Tennis balls and glass fire protection

In a post-Duchampian act, this was less intended to elevate the everyday but rather to question the hierarchical distinction between high and low. The slightly curved transparent screen on which sides bright tennis balls are spread evoke the artist’s ongoing concern with sites of leisure and play.

 

Mouchoirs abstraits, 1986/2015 (on the wall)

Fabric handkerchief 

Characteristic of her continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present. In 1986 Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster exhibited 12 mouchoirs abstraits at the Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des beaux-arts in Grenoble.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled, 1987/2015
Aluminum objects, survival blanket

Characteristic of her continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present. As temporary marker of leisure, the picnic blanket relates to Gonzalez-Foerster’s ongoing preoccupation with urban parks and beaches, in her words, “as places for playing, full of possibilities... It’s not like the city...It’s an open territory.”

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1987/2015 (foreground right)
Tennis balls and glass fire protection

In a post-Duchampian act, this was less intended to elevate the everyday but rather to question the hierarchical distinction between high and low. The slightly curved transparent screen on which sides bright tennis balls are spread evoke the artist’s ongoing concern with sites of leisure and play.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1986/2015 (back right)
Column and surface with carpet

Placed in front of the rectangular shape, the column covered in the same material creates the optical effect of partially disappearing or fusing. Perhaps in reference to the traditional distinctions between sculpture and painting (and its reprise in modernism of three-dimensionality vs. flatness), the dynamic contrasts the sculptural presence of the columnar shape with the two-dimensionality of the wall.

 

Untitled, 1987/2015 (back left)
Tennis balls and glass fire protection

In a post-Duchampian act, this was less intended to elevate the everyday but rather to question the hierarchical distinction between high and low. The slightly curved transparent screen on which sides bright tennis balls are spread evoke the artist’s ongoing concern with sites of leisure and play.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1985 (back right)
Books, bricks and wood

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015 

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Untitled, 1985 (back left)
Books, bricks and wood

 

Untitled, 1985/2015 (back right)

Vase, lily flower, alarm clock

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled, 1987/2015 (foreground)
Tennis balls and glass fire protection

In a post-Duchampian act, this was less intended to elevate the everyday but rather to question the hierarchical distinction between high and low. The slightly curved transparent screen on which sides bright tennis balls are spread evoke the artist’s ongoing concern with sites of leisure and play.

 

Mouchoirs abstraits, 1986/2015 (background)

Fabric handkerchief 

Characteristic of her continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present. In 1986 Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster exhibited 12 mouchoirs abstraits at the Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des beaux-arts in Grenoble.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1986/2015 (back right)
Column and surface with carpet

Placed in front of the rectangular shape, the column covered in the same material creates the optical effect of partially disappearing or fusing. Perhaps in reference to the traditional distinctions between sculpture and painting (and its reprise in modernism of three-dimensionality vs. flatness), the dynamic contrasts the sculptural presence of the columnar shape with the two-dimensionality of the wall.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015 

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015 (foreground)

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015 (middleground)

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1986/2015 (background)
Column and surface with carpet

Placed in front of the rectangular shape, the column covered in the same material creates the optical effect of partially disappearing or fusing. Perhaps in reference to the traditional distinctions between sculpture and painting (and its reprise in modernism of three-dimensionality vs. flatness), the dynamic contrasts the sculptural presence of the columnar shape with the two-dimensionality of the wall.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Untitled, 1987/2015
Plastic red buckets and white architect lamps
For this exhibition, the artist recreated works from her early years. The unlikely pairing of desk lamps and plastic buckets creates a grouping of luminous objects. Characteristic of her continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled, 1985/2015 (foreground)
Two telephones

Characteristic of the artist's continuous play with temporal displacements and the subjectivity of experience, the work conflates past and present.

 

Untitled, 1987/2015 (background)

Tennis balls and glass fire protection

In a post-Duchampian act, this was less intended to elevate the everyday but rather to question the hierarchical distinction between high and low. The slightly curved transparent screen on which sides bright tennis balls are spread evoke the artist’s ongoing concern with sites of leisure and play.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015 (foreground)

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled (Marilyn), 2015

Printed images on aluminum, fabric

As part of a work created specially for Museu de Arte Moderna in Rio de Janeiro, Gonzalez-Foerster appears as Marilyn Monroe in the famous skinny dip scene from her unfinished last movie, Something’s Got to Give (1962), with this connecting us back to the early modern days of the museum and the mid-sixties when Gonzalez-Foerster was born.

 

Le Désert Rouge, 1991/2015 (background)

Colored carpet and metal fixture

On the one hand, the combination of ready-made objects is indebted to the artistic discourse from the time of its first execution when items from daily life were introduced into an art context to question the nature of an artwork. On the other hand, the work evokes formal issues associated with modernist and post-modernist discussions. Thus the rectangular section of red carpet on the floor evokes the artist's preoccupation with the floor as site of learning.

 

Untitled, 1985 (background)
Books, bricks and wood

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Untitled, 1985
Books, bricks and wood

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Archive

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Archive

 

Photo © Pat Kilgore

Temporama

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro
June 20 – August 9, 2015
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The Museu de Arte Moderna’s Temporama, presented 12 works by Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster. The exhibition, curated by Pablo Léon de la Barra, covered 1,800 square meters on the second floor of MAM and included iconic works the artist produced between 1985 and 1991, reconstructed for the first time for this exhibition. The show also included a single work produced this year, “an abstract swimming pool,” which featured photographs of the artist appearing as Marilyn Monroe.

 

The curator, Pablo León de la Barra, explains that “Gonzalez-Foerster has had a strong relationship with Brazil and Rio de Janeiro since 1998 ... She lives part of the time in Rio, and this has a strong influence on her work.” The artist herself adds that she was involved in “a lot of presentations with the Capacete group in Rio de Janeiro” and did four short films in Brazil: Plages, inspired by Burle Marx’s great design for the Copacabana beachfront; Marquise, in Ibirapuera Park, São Paulo, Gloria in Praça Paris, Rio de Janeiro, and Brasília at Parque da Cidade, which is part of the Moderna Museet collection in Stockholm. “In my work,” she explains, “I use a lot of references from Lina Bo Bardi, Burle Marx, Sérgio Bernardes, and others.”

  

Temporama was conceived specifically for MAM and the “tropical modernism” of Alfonso Reidy (1909–1964), the architect who designed the museum in harmony with the surrounding landscape of Flamengo Park. The exhibition broadens the notion of the traditional retrospective to a longer time frame, probing into the future and receding back in time.

 

As Gonzalez-Foerster explains, the exhibition “takes shape like a time machine, a park, a beach, a view, and a panorama. A place where we can stop time and experience different space-times.”

 

Red and turquoise filters placed along the length of the exhibition took visitors back to Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s first works from the 1980s and also to the MAM of the twentieth century.

 

“The glass façades allow the landscape into the museum. Inside and outside mingle in the exhibition space, which becomes a continuation of the landscape. The glass also sets up a play of reflections and mirages, where different images of Rio overlap with the visitors’ memories and desires. Indeed, any art exhibited at MAM is not just presented inside the museum, but also drifts into the landscape, becoming part of it,” comments curator Pablo Léon de la Barra. 

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