Radio Three on the Tree in the Light of the Dark Black Night

Nathan Carter
May 3 – June 7, 2008

Hung in the window of the gallery, the large-format poster designed by Paul Elliman with the title of the exhibition acts as an interface between institution and visitors.

 

Photo © Hans-Georg Gaul

RADIO THREE, 2008

Steel, acrylic paint
The work consists of radio antennae that receive and broadcast various messages, signals and frequencies. The two wall-mounted works also show different communications systems in simplified form, like twittering birds perched on twigs. 
 

Photo © Hans-Georg Gaul

RADIO THREE, 2008 (center)

Steel, acrylic paint
The work consists of radio antennae that receive and broadcast various messages, signals and frequencies. The two wall-mounted works also show different communications systems in simplified form, like twittering birds perched on twigs. 
 
THREE ON THE TREE, 2008 (wall)
Plywood, acrylic paint
The artist combines complex communications systems with references to twentieth-century U.S. cultural history, especially American Modernism, which he translates into a simplified formal idiom.
 

Photo © Hans-Georg Gaul

The Final Run-iNs / TFRI BERLIN SAID, 2008
Music and sculpture project, steel, nylon, yarn

The artist and Matthew Ronay performing an ongoing music and sculpture project. The concert space, left for the duration of the exhibition, forms the central work within this cooperative band project.

 

Photo © Hans-Georg Gaul

Radio Three on the Tree in the Light of the Dark Black Night

Nathan Carter
May 3 – June 7, 2008
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Nathan Carter’s third solo exhibition at Esther Schipper is a collaboration with artists Matthew Ronay and Justin Beal, costume designer Daphne Javitch and a poster made by Paul Elliman.

 

Nathan Carter’s mobile RADIO THREE consists of radio antennae that receive and broadcast various messages, signals and frequencies. The two wall-mounted works also show different communications systems in simplified form, like twittering birds perched on twigs. The collaborative pieces mark out the setting for Carter’s works. With Daphne Javitch, he developed the antenna-like sculpture GESU MARIA!!! WHAT AN ADVENTURE! that includes a range of figures and materials including steel, paper, wood and textiles. Justin Beal’s MONTAG TO FREITAG is a series of hand-made collage posters that document the setting up of the exhibition, adding up to a framed wall newspaper. Hung in the window of the gallery, the large-format poster designed by Paul Elliman with the title of the exhibition acts as an interface between institution and visitors.

 

Nathan Carter’s works are characterized by the multiple layering of different systems. He combines complex communications systems with references to twentieth-century U.S. cultural history, especially American Modernism, which he translates into a simplified formal idiom. The title gives clues to their origins. THREE ON THE TREE is an expression from hot rod culture—the transformation of pre-WW2 automobiles into racing cars by stripping down and installing a more powerful motor. IN THE LIGHT OF THE DARK BLACK NIGHT is a line from the Beatles song Blackbird, written by Paul McCartney as a reaction to the racial unrest in the United States in the spring of 1968 and released on the band’s legendary White Album.

 

At the opening, Nathan Carter and Matthew Ronay will perform as Final Run iNs, an ongoing music and sculpture project. The concert space will be left for the duration of the exhibition, forming the central work within this cooperative band project.

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