Aerosolar Journeys

Tomás Saraceno
February 11 – April 30, 2017

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Cloud House (documentation table) (front)

 

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Cloud House (documentation table) (front; detail)

 

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring 

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Steps – Leaps – Footprint, 2016 (on the wall; left)

Inkjet print, diptych two photographic prints mounted on dibond and framed separately

The well-known documentary photo from 1969 shows the footprint that Buzz Aldrin, the American astronaut, left on the surface of Moon. The launching of space missions could be understood as a maximum of air mobility that in turn leaves its own footprint, and pushes the atmospheric changes of the planet. The peculiar photograph from White Sands depicts the diametrically opposite: an individual being lifted by cosmic forces, the sun ray beams that heated D-O AEC Aerocene sculpture.

 

Eclipse of Aerocene Explorer, 2016 (on the wall; right)

Inkjet print

The photograph was taken during the performance at Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia in January 2016, during Tomás Saraceno’s artistic expedition. Salar de Uyuni salt flat is estimated to be the biggest lithium depository in Earth. Atop of the Uyuni salt crust, the Aerocene sculptures floated proposing to keep the natural resources in the ground, and to relate to energy cycles differently: harnessing Sun and Earth as the sole batteries.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Steps – Leaps – Footprint, 2016 (on the wall; left)

Inkjet print, diptych two photographic prints mounted on dibond and framed separately

The well-known documentary photo from 1969 shows the footprint that Buzz Aldrin, the American astronaut, left on the surface of Moon. The launching of space missions could be understood as a maximum of air mobility that in turn leaves its own footprint, and pushes the atmospheric changes of the planet. The peculiar photograph from White Sands depicts the diametrically opposite: an individual being lifted by cosmic forces, the sun ray beams that heated D-O AEC Aerocene sculpture.

 

Eclipse of Aerocene Explorer, 2016 (on the wall; right)

Inkjet print

The photograph was taken during the performance at Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia in January 2016, during Tomás Saraceno’s artistic expedition. Salar de Uyuni salt flat is estimated to be the biggest lithium depository in Earth. Atop of the Uyuni salt crust, the Aerocene sculptures floated proposing to keep the natural resources in the ground, and to relate to energy cycles differently: harnessing Sun and Earth as the sole batteries.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Eclipse of Aerocene Explorer, 2016 (on the wall)

Inkjet print

The photograph was taken during the performance at Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia in January 2016, during Tomás Saraceno’s artistic expedition. Salar de Uyuni salt flat is estimated to be the biggest lithium depository in Earth. Atop of the Uyuni salt crust, the Aerocene sculptures floated proposing to keep the natural resources in the ground, and to relate to energy cycles differently: harnessing Sun and Earth as the sole batteries.

 

Sunny Day, 2017

Mylar transparent and metalized, tape, pump with overpressure release valve, polyester rope, net, metal ring

The inflatable structures that make up the installation communicate a new way of flying, one that relies only on the difference in temperature between inside and outside the sculpture, heated only by the sun and the infrared radiation of the Earth. Floating like this provides an alternative to the linear vector flight of propulsion technology, replacing it with sympoetic choreography. 

 

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Becoming Aerosolar Free Flight 1227, 2015 (detail)

Cargo bike, ventilator, wind tunnel, weather station, solar panels, car battery, solar charge controller, power transformer, radio tracker, radio station, lightweight chair, lightweight stool

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view

Aerosolar Journey, 2017

Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Aerocene Gemini, Free Flight, 2016

Single-channel video (colour, silent)

2h52'08" 

 

Aerocene, launches at White Sands (NM, United States), 2015

Documentary

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Aerocene Explorer, 2016

Backpack on the wall
The tethered-flight starter kit, currently in its beta version, enables anyone to launch their own personal exploration of the atmosphere. The display shows different parts that can complement the Explorer: traps to research the airborne biodiversity and forms of life in the air; multimedia recording tools to carry out aerial photography experiments; transmitters to provide GPS and radio tracking and contribute to aerosolar sounding infrastructure to come.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Aerocene Explorer, 2016

Backpack on the wall 
The tethered-flight starter kit, currently in its beta version, enables anyone to launch their own personal exploration of the atmosphere. The display shows different parts that can complement the Explorer: traps to research the airborne biodiversity and forms of life in the air; multimedia recording tools to carry out aerial photography experiments; transmitters to provide GPS and radio tracking and contribute to aerosolar sounding infrastructure to come.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Biosphere 05, 2009

Rope

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing (left)

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

 

Semi-social mapping of A0136-0801 by a solo Cyrtophora citricola - eight weeks, 2016 (on the wall)

Spider silk, archival paper, fixative, ink

 

Hybrid solitary solitary semi-social semi-social semi-social Amateru built by: a solo Nephila senegalensis - one week, a solo Nephila senegalensis - two weeks, a duet of Cyrtophora citricola - four weeks, a solo Cyrtophora citricola - one week, a solo Cyrtophora citricola - two weeks, a quartet of Cyrtophora citricola juveniles - two weeks, and a nonet of Cyrtophora citrico-la juveniles - two weeks, rotated 180°, 2017

Spidersilk, carbon fibre, ink, glass, metal, carbon fibre frame

The translucent Plexiglas cube hosts unusual webs built by different species of spiders. These webs are hybrid creations woven by different species of spiders one atop the other’s web. The webs that have been spray painted with an extremely lightweight black ink. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hybrid solitary solitary semi-social semi-social semi-social Amateru built by: a solo Nephila senegalensis - one week, a solo Nephila senegalensis - two weeks, a duet of Cyrtophora citricola - four weeks, a solo Cyrtophora citricola - one week, a solo Cyrtophora citricola - two weeks, a quartet of Cyrtophora citricola juveniles - two weeks, and a nonet of Cyrtophora citrico-la juveniles - two weeks, rotated 180°, 2017

Spidersilk, carbon fibre, ink, glass, metal, carbon fibre frame

The translucent Plexiglas cube hosts unusual webs built by different species of spiders. These webs are hybrid creations woven by different species of spiders one atop the other’s web. The webs that have been spray painted with an extremely lightweight black ink. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view

Aerosolar Journey, 2017

Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view

Aerosolar Journey, 2017

Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Museo Aero Solar, 2007–ongoing

Reused plastic bags, ventilator, tape, polyester rope, fabric

The work is a flying museum, a solar sculpture entirely made from reused plastic bags, with new sections being added each time it travels the world, thus changing techniques, drawings, and shapes, and growing in size every time it sets sail in the air. Museo Aero Solar stands for a different conception of space and energy, both anomalous and forceful at the same time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Becoming Aerosolar Free Flight 1227, 2015

Cargo bike, ventilator, wind tunnel, weather station, solar panels, car battery, solar charge controller, power transformer, radio tracker, radio station, lightweight chair, lightweight stool

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Aerosolar Journeys

Tomás Saraceno
Wilhelm-Hack-Museum, Ludwigshafen
February 11 – April 30, 2017
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Tomás Saraceno (born 1973, in San Miguel, Argentina) is convinced that art can change the world. He studied Art and Architecture at Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, before relocating to Europe in 2001. Other stages in his education were the Städelschule in Germany (under Thomas Bayrle) and Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia (under Hans Ulrich Obrist and Olafur Eliasson). Today, Saraceno lives and works in Berlin, where he and his team work on exhibition projects.

 

The 43-year-old Tomás Saraceno views his work as a process of constant artistic and multidisciplinary research that pursues the idea of a “realizable utopia”. Inspired by physical and biological phenomena such as the thermodynamics of the atmosphere or the web structures among spiders, he works together with biologists, engineers or architects to create large-format sculptures and installations. His works continue the visionary spirit of Constructivism, recalling the way that Kasimir Malevich or El Lissitzky dreamt of flying buildings. In response to global, ecological issues, Saraceno’s works are intended as models for future, sustainable life forms.

 

The exhibition at Wilhelm Hack Museum is the first comprehensive presentation of Tomás Saraceno’s Aerocene, or “Air era”. The project involves developing a wide array of flying sculptures held afloat entirely by thermals, without engines, gas, fossil fuels or solar cells. By day, the sculptures gain updraft solely through the heat of the sun, at night from the infrared radiation of the Earth’s surface. Initial trial flights have already taken place and pilots have been specially trained. During the exhibition period there will be a test flight starting at Berlin’s Schönefeld airfield and which will be streamed live.

 

Tomás Saraceno has collaborated with NASA, the French space agency CNES, and currently works with MIT. Initiated as an art project, the Aerocene vision swiftly developed with a group of artists, designers, scientists and activists into a forum for ecological problems such as environmental pollution or the reliance on fossil and carbon-dioxide based fuels. In the context of the current energy crisis, Tomás Saraceno and the Aerocene community seek solutions for sustainable travel, life and research to protect the Earth’s biodiversity in the long term. The latest invention, the Aerocene Explorer, is a control-line flight starter kit, enabling anyone to fly a sculpture without fuel or a motor, so that anyone can have a personal Aerocene experience.

 

Alongside several Aerocene sculptures, the exhibition also highlights the infancy of Aerocene research: the Museo Aero Solar, a massive sculpture made of reused plastic bags that will resemble a walk-through cathedral at the Wilhelm Hack Museum. The spherical sculpture is likewise a thermal flying object where the updraft is provided solely by solar heat. During the exhibition, the Aero studio will produce a new Museo Aero Solar on site.

 

The presentation is accompanied by large-format photographs, for example of outdoor flying actions, film footage, and another hands-on action: the Cloud Lab, a lab in which a new Cloudy House will be made. The Cloudy House is a three-dimensional vision of a life-world composed of a system of small modules. Here, too, we can witness how in his experimental works and sculptures Tomás Saraceno transposes network structures from nature onto architecture and real space and urban planning.

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