Ceal Floyer

Ceal Floyer
September 6 – October 11, 2008
No Positions Available, 2007
Installation, signs on wall
 
Site-specific installation using show-window signs with "No Position Available" on the one side and "Help Wanted" on the other. Only the side with "No Position Available" is visible to the viewer. The signs fill one wall with the smallest possible distance between them, so there is "no position available" on its surface. 
 
Photo © Nick Ash
Untitled, 2008
Metal box, "Closed" sign
 
Red suggestions box, locked by the chain of a "closed” sign.
 
Photo © Carsten Eisfeld
Wish You Were Here, 2008
Postcard holder
 
"Wish You Were Here" works with the sentimental cliché habitually written on the back of a postcards. This often unthinkingly repeated phrase corresponds with the object, an empty display rack that complains of its missing "content". 
 
Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

View into the exhibition from the street

 

Photo © Carsten Eisfeld

Ceal Floyer

Ceal Floyer
September 6 – October 11, 2008
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In her second solo show at Esther Schipper, Ceal Floyer is showing an audio installation and two works based on found objects that address the viewer’s perceptions and cognitive faculties. Floyer often develops her works out of serendipitous observations and situations, dealing in a slightly ironic way with phenomena of language and meaning.

 

The countless signs in No Positions Available (2007) cover one whole wall of the gallery. Floyer plays with the different meanings of the title, which can be read in either material or abstract terms. The sign’s message refers to its own physical properties within the exhibition, becoming part of the space by virtue of its repetition. On the wall, no position remains vacant.

 

Wish you were here (2008) works with the sentimental cliché habitually written on the back of postcards. This often hollow, unthinkingly repeated phrase corresponds with the object, an empty display rack that complains of its missing “content”. It becomes a picture, a painting against a background. In formal and aesthetic terms, the postcard rack also refers to well-known found objects, such as Duchamp’s Bottle Rack, which he exhibited without making any alterations. Unlike Duchamp, Floyer gives the object a new name, shifting it onto a semantic and poetic level.

 

Although the title Dancing Flames (2007) subtly influences the way viewers perceive the piece, they are then left to experience and judge what is presented for themselves. In the space, sound and image are clearly separated from one another. The merging of the two takes place exclusively in the viewer’s mind. The two flames move in synch; the installation is not choreographed in any way; the music of various styles is played in a random order.

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