Gost Log

Matti Braun
October 6, 2012 – January 6, 2013

Each of the four works on the left:

Untitled, 2010

Fabric paint, raw silk and cold rolled steel

 

Group of two on the right:

Untitled, 2010
C-prints, 2 parts

 

The works are part of the installation

Pierre Pierre, 2010
Concrete, sand, black light, fluorescent paint

The multifarious, interdisciplinary links that are brought together in Pierre Pierre both by the paintings, the prints, but also by the changed conditions in the space are characteristic of Braun's artistic project, which includes the creation of a rich web of historical and cultural associations to draw attention to the cultural trajectory of all objects and to highlight their indebtedness to their surroundings and our reception. 

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Both works:

Untitled, 2010

Fabric paint, raw silk and cold rolled steel

 

The works are part of the installation

Pierre Pierre, 2010
Concrete, sand, black light, fluorescent paint
The multifarious, interdisciplinary links that are brought together in Pierre Pierre both by the paintings, the prints, but also by the changed conditions in the space are characteristic of Braun's artistic project, which includes the creation of a rich web of historical and cultural associations to draw attention to the cultural trajectory of all objects and to highlight their indebtedness to their surroundings and our reception. 

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

All three wall hangings:

Untitled, 2003
Silkscreen on fabric, colored by hand 

Woven fabrics have a long tradition in India and Indonesia. Historically, many Patolas were designed and made entirely for export, their geometric patterns catering for the specific tastes of the country that they were being sent to. Matti Braun’s fascination for the Patolas lies within their very complex method of production, which is supposed to have magical powers, and especially in the symbiosis of highbrow processes, technical perfection and mystical inscription.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

R.T/S.R/V.S, 2003/2012 (floor)

Tree discs, pond, water

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

All three wall hangings:

Untitled, 2003
Silkscreen on fabric, colored by hand 
Woven fabrics have a long tradition in India and Indonesia. Historically, many Patolas were designed and made entirely for export, their geometric patterns catering for the specific tastes of the country that they were being sent to. Matti Braun’s fascination for the Patolas lies within their very complex method of production, which is supposed to have magical powers, and especially in the symbiosis of highbrow processes, technical perfection and mystical inscription.
 
In the middleground:

Untitled, 2005

Concrete

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

R.T/S.R/V.S, 2003/2012

Tree discs, pond, water

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

R.T/S.R/V.S, 2003/2012

Tree discs, pond, water

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

R.T/S.R/V.S, 2003/2012

Tree discs, pond, water

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

La Pekuniala Teroio di Silvio Gessell, 2002 (left)

Video

Duration 09:00 min

The video shows documents from the life of Silvio Gesell, born 1862. He was first a commercial clerk in Spain, then an entrepreneur in Argentina, lived in Switzerland and moved to the life reform community “Eden” near Berlin in 1919. He is the author of numerous books on currency issues and was even nominated for Minister of Finance in Bavaria. Braun’s approach to Gesell emphasizes, also through the voice-over commentary spoken in the artificial language Ido, the gaps in interpretation and the misunderstandings that may be implicit to a reconstruction of this kind.

 

R.T/S.R/V.S, 2003/2012 (floor)

Tree discs, pond, water

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

All three wall hangings:

Untitled, 2003
Silkscreen on fabric, colored by hand
Woven fabrics have a long tradition in India and Indonesia. Historically, many Patolas were designed and made entirely for export, their geometric patterns catering for the specific tastes of the country that they were being sent to. Matti Braun’s fascination for the Patolas lies within their very complex method of production, which is supposed to have magical powers, and especially in the symbiosis of highbrow processes, technical perfection and mystical inscription.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

From left to right:

 

Serchado poemo en dek Kanti, 2002
A Couturat, 2002

Bunta Garbo, 2002
All works: digital prints mounted on forex

This project excavates the little-known work of the Belgian writer Andreas Juste (1918–98). Written in the ‘international language’ Ido, Juste’s entire literary output (of approximately twenty-five self-published novels, collections of poems, pamphlets and translations) is largely unavailable, and if it were so, it could only be properly understood by probably, at most, 1000 readers worldwide.

 

La Pekuniala Teroio di Silvio Gessell, 2002

Video

Duration 09:00 min

The video shows documents from the life of Silvio Gesell, born 1862. He was first a commercial clerk in Spain, then an entrepreneur in Argentina, lived in Switzerland and moved to the life reform community “Eden” near Berlin in 1919. He is the author of numerous books on currency issues and was even nominated for Minister of Finance in Bavaria. Braun’s approach to Gesell emphasizes, also through the voice-over commentary spoken in the artificial language Ido, the gaps in interpretation and the misunderstandings that may be implicit to a reconstruction of this kind.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

From left to right:

 

Serchado poemo en dek Kanti, 2002
A Couturat, 2002

Bunta Garbo, 2002 
All works: digital prints mounted on forex 

This project excavates the little-known work of the Belgian writer Andreas Juste (1918–98). Written in the ‘international language’ Ido, Juste’s entire literary output (of approximately twenty-five self-published novels, collections of poems, pamphlets and translations) is largely unavailable, and if it were so, it could only be properly understood by probably, at most, 1000 readers worldwide.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Exhibition view

Gost Log, 2012–13

Arnolfini, Bristol

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Untitled, 2005 (floor)

Concrete


The Alien (London), 2007 (wall)

Injekprints on paper

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Untitled, 2012 (right)

Pottery

In collaboration with Philip and Frannie Leach

 

Textile from the collection of Rudolph Smend (left)

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Untitled, 2012 (center)

Pottery

In collaboration with Philip and Frannie Leach

 

Textile from the collection of Rudolph Smend (left)

Textile from the collection of Matti Braun (right)

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Untitled, 2012

Pottery

In collaboration with Philip and Frannie Leach

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Untitled, 2005
Glass
The mouth-blown spherical glass bowl oscillates between the sculptural and the handicraft. The cultural tension between these two sections of production, the high-art context and the lower estimated arts and craft, is exposed and surpassed in an ambivalent object.

 

Photo © Jamie Woodley / Arnolfini

Gost Log

Matti Braun
Arnolfini, Bristol
October 6, 2012 – January 6, 2013
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Gost Log presented a selection of key works by Matti Braun from the preceding fifteen years, along with new works specifically made for the exhibition. His delicate paintings on silk, prints, objects and installations are often based on stories and on histories of specific people or ideas but draw from these his own formal and conceptual explorations. Referring to different craft traditions, contemporary aesthetics, design and fashion, Braun’s work focuses on moments of intense exchange between global cultures. His practice explores cultural misunderstandings and their impact on forms and ideas, elucidating social and aesthetic developments that may have been overlooked or buried. Following his research interests, Braun develops an eclectic and elaborate mesh of concepts that challenges conventional interpretations of Modernity. Central to Braun’s practice is his particular approach to referencing: certain images, objects or names are deliberately employed, but left open in their meaning in relation to the exhibition. We could read them as formal arrangement of artifacts, or as glimpses of an extensive rhizomatic network of ideas and cultural practices, or both.

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