Return to Noreturn

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
April 21 – May 19, 2012

Greenred (Sculpture), 2012 (through the door)
Curtain of green and red PVC straps

With this exhibition the artist returns to both the film Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008-09. Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Greenred (Sculpture), 2012

Curtain of green and red PVC straps

With this exhibition the artist returns to both the film Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008-09. Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. 

 

Old Dream (Text Piece), 2012 (wall, back)

Vinyl letters on wall

The text piece is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012
4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books

The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Greenred (Sculpture), 2012 (detail)
Curtain of green and red PVC straps

With this exhibition the artist returns to both the film Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008-09. Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. 

 

Old Dream (Text Piece), 2012 (wall)
Vinyl letters on wall

The text piece is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Old Dream (Text Piece), 2012 (left)

Vinyl letters on wall

The text piece is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

Calder Red (Painting), 2012 (center, detail)

Latex paint on existing column or specially built column

Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier TH.2058 exhibition and film. 

 

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012 (right, detail)

4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books

The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012 (front)

4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books
The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.
 

Calder Red (Painting), 2012 (left)

Latex paint on existing column or specially built column

Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier TH.2058 exhibition and film. 

 

Old Dream (Text Piece), 2012 (wall)

Vinyl letters on wall

The text piece is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012

4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books
The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.
 
Romilly (Video), 2012 (wall, back)
HD Video, color, sound
Duration: 4:00 minuntes
The film isolates one of the characters from Noreturn, a little girl that like Dorothy of The Wizard of Oz, embodies the children/cinema relation. 
 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012 (detail)
4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books

The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dublinesca (Installation), 2012 (detail)
4 bunk beds (3 blue, 1 yellow), 8 books

The exhibition space is transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. The artist returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058 exhibition at Tate Modern, where the artist presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

2058 (Bibliography), 2012
Grey carpet, 400 books

With this exhibition the artist returns to both the film Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008-09. Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. The exhibition space is again transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

2058 (Bibliography), 2012
Grey carpet, 400 books

With this exhibition the artist returns to both the film Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern in 2008-09. Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. The exhibition space is again transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Old dream (Small Edition), 2012

Vinyl text on wall

The text piece is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Noreturn, 2009

HD film, color, sound, 16:9 format
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. 
 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Noreturn, 2009

HD film, color, sound, 16:9 format
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. 
 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Noreturn, 2009 (film still)

HD film, color, sound, 16:9 format
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. 
 
Photo @ Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

Noreturn, 2009 (film still)

HD film, color, sound, 16:9 format
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. 
 
Photo @ Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
 

Noreturn, 2009 (film still)

HD film (color, sound, 16:9 format)
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. 
 
Photo @ Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

Noreturn, 2009 (film still)

HD film, color, sound, 16:9 format
Duration: 16:00 minutes
The film was shot in the artist's TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008–09. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds.
 
Photo @ Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster

Return to Noreturn

Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
April 21 – May 19, 2012
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"Towards a culture of the quotation in a context of catastrophe" was the title of Enrique Vila-Matas’ chapter for TH.2058, a book designed like a science fiction novel that was the catalogue for Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s TH.2058 exhibition at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall in 2008/09. In it Vila-Matas described that exhibition even before having seen it like this: “On every bunk there is at least one book, a book that has survived the humidity thanks to modern corrective treatments (...) ‘I‘m imagining,’ says the voice-over, ‘that the end of the summer has arrived and that I‘m going to London to see in the Turbine Hall what the city will be like in 2058.” In his novel Dublinesca, published after the exhibition, Vila-Matas also wrote about his visit to the Turbine Hall and about the exhibition’s relation to reference and quotation. TH.2058 and Dublinesca then explore timelines in which visitors travel both toward the future and toward the past.

 

Both the novel Dublinesca and the TH.2058 catalogue are now part of the exhibition Return to Noreturn. Not unlike Dorothy going back to the land of Oz in Walter Murch’s film, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster returns to Noreturn (2009), taking apart the film shot in the TH.2058. There, with a comprehensive installation in the main Turbine Hall, Gonzalez-Foerster presented a scenario in which humans and sculptures found shelter and protection from endless rains. The film referred to the earlier exhibition in London by depicting a raucous visit by a group of children in school uniforms who eventually fall asleep exhaustedly on the bunk beds. With this exhibition the artist returns to both the Noreturn and her exhibition at the Tate Modern.

 

Presented in more traditional exhibition formats such as painting, sculpture, text, sound and video, all works are elements and quotations taken from the earlier exhibition and film. The exhibition space is again transformed into a utopian environment at a future point in time.

 

In addition, Romilly (2012), a film presented here for the first time, isolates one of the characters from Noreturn, a little girl that like Dorothy embodies the children/cinema relation. The text piece Old Dream is generated from the subtitles of Noreturn. Its typographic design is by Marie Proyart and set in Bitstream Flareserif 821, a font inspired by Berthold Wolpe‘s Albertus (1938).

 

The text reads:

in this dream, it is endless

we have gone beyond the point of no return we stay there in front of the screens

as if we were in a gigantic airplane

traveling without a destination. 

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