Social... Quasi Social... Solitary... Spiders... On Hybrid Cosmic Webs

Tomás Saraceno
March 15 – April 13, 2013

Exhibition view

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Sculptor 2 Cyrtophora citricola, 2013

Barnard Pholcus Palangoides – Tegenaria atrica, 2013 

13 Tucana 0 Cyrtophara citricola – Tegenaria atrica, 2013

Willman Cyrtophora citricola - 20 Anelosimus eximius, 2013

 

From left to right

All works: Spider web, acrylic cube, wooden stand, led illumination

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dorado 1 Agelena labyrintica, 2013

Quasar 4 Stromatopelma - Parasteatoda, 2013

Barnard Pholcus Palangoides – Tegenaria atrica, 2013

 

From left to right

All works: Spider web, acrylic cube, wooden stand, led illumination

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Quasar 4 Stromatopelma - Parasteatoda2013 

Willman Cyrtophora citricola - 20 Anelosimus eximius, 2013

Dorado 1 Agelena labyrintica2013

Barnard Pholcus Palangoides – Tegenaria atrica2013

 

From left to right

All works: Spider web, acrylic cube, wooden stand, led illumination

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Dorado 1 Agelena labyrintica, 2013

Barnard Pholcus Palangoides – Tegenaria atrica, 2013

Quasar 4 Stromatopelma - Parasteatoda, 2013

 

From left to right

All works: Spider web, acrylic cube, wooden stand, led illumination

 

The illuminated, translucent cubes host unusual webs built by different species of spiders. The artistic experiment weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behavior into questions of sharing, communicating and building. Tomás Saraceno’s research and work with spider webs originates from his interest in astrophysics - each of these translucent boxes represents an entire universe to him.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Canis Major Dwarf Anelosimus eximilus, 2013 (foreground)

Spider web, carbon fibre, LED light, Manfroto tripod 

 

The light rectangular frame serves as a support for the dense open multilayer structure of spider web. The abstract three-dimensional structures point to little explored facets of the universe and, at the same time, become associative signs of co-habitation, sociality and survival. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Canis Major Dwarf Anelosimus eximilus2013

Spider web, carbon fibre, LED light, Manfroto tripod 

 

The light rectangular frame serves as a support for the dense open multilayer structure of spider web. The abstract three-dimensional structures point to little explored facets of the universe and, at the same time, become associative signs of co-habitation, sociality and survival. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Comet 11 Cyrtophora citricola, 2013
Spider web, carbon fibre, dedolight 650 Watt, Manfroto tripod

 

The light rectangular frame serves as a support for the dense open multilayer structure of spider web. The abstract three-dimensional structures point to little explored facets of the universe and, at the same time, become associative signs of co-habitation, sociality and survival. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Comet 11 Cyrtophora citricola2013 (detail)
Spider web, carbon fibre, dedolight 650 Watt, Manfroto tripod

 

The light rectangular frame serves as a support for the dense open multilayer structure of spider web. The abstract three-dimensional structures point to little explored facets of the universe and, at the same time, become associative signs of co-habitation, sociality and survival. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Vitrine, 2013
MDF, paper prints, glass, light 

 

The works of Tomás Saraceno are developed in close cooperation with scientists and scientific institutes working in the fields of biology, physics, astrophysics, space studies, engineering, architecture and other disciplines. The art pieces on display in the vitrine are inspired by such collaborations where bold speculative creative propositions meet expertise of science. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Vitrine, 2013
MDF, paper prints, glass, light 

 

The works of Tomás Saraceno are developed in close cooperation with scientists and scientific institutes working in the fields of biology, physics, astrophysics, space studies, engineering, architecture and other disciplines. The art pieces on display in the vitrine are inspired by such collaborations where bold speculative creative propositions meet expertise of science. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Social... Quasi Social... Solitary... Spiders... On Hybrid Cosmic Webs

Tomás Saraceno
March 15 – April 13, 2013
Previous
Next

Esther Schipper is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of Tomás Saraceno at the gallery.

 

One of Saraceno’s key interests is the scientific observation of environmental, biological and physical systems and their poetic correlation to human perception and ideas about the living environment. Patterns, which the artist discovers in phenomena ranging from macro structures of the outer space to micro bio-systems of nature, invite to imagine alternative ways of the  organisation of life. In the exhibition Tomás Saraceno reveals one of the main sources of his research and inspiration, expanding spatial structures of spider webs. In the first room of the gallery illuminated, translucent cubes are hosting webs built by different species of spiders. Among them social spiders, a small minority between otherwise solitary insects that have developed a social ability. Almost all cobwebs on the display are hybrid creations woven by spiders on top of the older webs built by a different species. These unique multi-generational structures would never occur in ‘nature’. Supervising their development the artist touched upon key principles of social organisation: cooperation, cohabitation and hybridity. This is an artistic experiment that weaves architecture, biology, network analyses and social behaviour into questions of sharing, communicating and building.

 

In the second space of the gallery large-scale open cobweb installations emphasise the fragility and complexity of the natural structures. The look of the visitor can wander in labyrinths of the spider threads. Like almost all projects of the artist the current works were developed in collaboration with scientists: astrophysicists, arachnologists, radiologists, engineers, biologists and others. The process and unique findings of these collaborations are captured in the works presented in vitrines. Among them, for example, is the proposal for a study of spider webs in the condition of microgravity, which was submitted to the European Science Foundation.

 

The artist’s fascination with cobwebs arises from applying the image of a spider web in astrophysics where it is used to represent galaxy formations. The ongoing research project of Saraceno started out as an investigation of these universal patterns. The artist’s continuous interest in models of cohabitation, biodiversity, adaptability and hybridity led him further to experiments with spiders growing their homes in an artificial environment. Abstract three-dimensional structures created by the insects point out to little known facets of the universe and become associative signs of co-habitation, generational succession, sociality and survival.

Search