Macro World: One Hour3 and Canned

Angela Bulloch
June 1 – July 13, 2002

Macro World: One Hour3and Canned2002
35 DMX modules, raised Euro palette floor, suspended mirrored ceiling, sound, dur. of programme 60.00 min (loop)
253 x 355 x 50,7 cm


Photo © Howard Sheronas

Exhibition view: 
Macro World: One Hour3and Canned2002
35 DMX modules, raised Euro palette floor, suspended mirrored ceiling, sound, dur. of programme 60.00 min (loop)
253 x 355 x 50,7 cm

Photo © Howard Sheronas

Exhibition view:
Macro World: One Hour3and Canned2002
35 DMX modules, raised Euro palette floor, suspended mirrored ceiling, sound, dur. of programme 60.00 min (loop)
253 x 355 x 50,7 cm

Photo © Howard Sheronas

Exhibition view:
Macro World: One Hour3and Canned2002
35 DMX modules, raised Euro palette floor, suspended mirrored ceiling, sound, dur. of programme 60.00 min (loop)
253 x 355 x 50,7 cm

Photo © Christensen

Original exhibition invitation

Macro World: One Hour3 and Canned

Angela Bulloch
Schipper & Krome, Berlin
June 1 – July 13, 2002
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The way the pixel module developed by Angela Bulloch is treated in the present installation deals even stronger than before with the connection between the media and everyday life. 

 

The trend towards an interchangeability of globalised TV formats is condensed here into a pixel wall of 2,50 x 3,50 m as a carrier of abstracted visual information.

 

While the pixel screen Z-Point, currently exhibited at Fondation Beyeler ("Claude Monet …bis zum digitalen Impressionismus," prolonged until August 18, 2002) refers to Antonioni's film Zabriskie Point as the source of Bulloch's regulation of abstraction, the starting point of the new piece is the reference to current television programmes. 

 

In Macro World: One Hour3and Canned Angela Bulloch uses material from BBC World: World News, Global Weather - the topography of an invisible world, presented to us merely as a map and as standardised, depersonalised platform: "Equatorial depressions today." Increasingly interchangeable commercials promoting global players, produced by likewise multinational advertising agencies, and the interview programme HARDtalk with current prominent opinion-leaders. 

 

Every hour on the hour at BBC World an almost perpetually uniform programme is broadcast worldwide, 24 hours a day, seven days a week… 

 

In the hour-long cycle of material there are deliberate mistakes placed into the programme. They can be seen at intervals throughout the loop: A single pixel of a strange colour appears within the fractured image and grows across the screen. The mistakes block out the already not quite recognisable images of talking heads or landscape scenes, exactly the kind of images you see on standardised news programmes like BBC World. An ambient sound track featuring the BBC World's corporate sound identity, called BBC World: The Music by David Lowe, accompanies the loop.

The work is 'framed' by a raised floor made of Euro palettes and a lowered ceiling of plastic mirror tiles, the gallery space is thus condensed into an irregular cube.

 

Apart from one hour BBC World condensed by the pixel screen, two further pieces from the series Micro_World are exhibited: Single pixel modules, mounted on metal legs, each depicting the portrayal of a single programme, like an abstract substratum trimmed into shape, International News and Global Weather.

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