• Guess Whose Studio Pt.5

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.5

    Welcome to the next instalment of the series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

     

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track: 1

    1. Everything on their desktop⁠

    2. A Scotsman in London⁠

    3. Only thing missing are the eggs⁠

    4. Worlds within worlds⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Messages from Home – Francesco Gennari

    Messages from Home – Francesco Gennari

    Photo © Francesco Gennari, 15 aprile 2020⁠

     

    VIAGGI DA CAMERA is the new online project from the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi. "Viaggi da camera" collects and distributes daily images, videos and texts, chosen by artists invited to tell their home and private space. Every day a new contribution will be published on the Foundation's website and social channels.⁠

    Inspired by Xavier de Maistre's famous 18th century novel "Journey around my room" - written during a 42-day obligatory stay in a room in Turin - "Viaggi da camera" invites artists to open the doors of their real and imaginary rooms. Taken from day #39, Francesco Gennari shared a glimpse into his home life in the midst of lockdown.⁠

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.4

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.4

    Welcome to the next instalment of the series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track:

     

    ⁠⁠1. Has been with the gallery for over 30 years
    ⁠2. The sky's the limit⁠
    3. Loves rules
    ⁠4. Enjoys heavy metal⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

    Journey Through the Gallery – Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

    Exhibition view: Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019⁠
    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In this next instalment of Journey Through the Gallery, we look back to November 2019 where we presented Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, Tomás Saraceno's third solo exhibition with the gallery. ⁠

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, Slow Graffiti

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone,  Slow Graffiti

    Ugo Rondinone, If there were anywhere but desert, Monday, 2000, fiberglass, paint, clothing, glitter, 86 x 76 x 122 cm. Photo © Studio Rondinone

     

    Ugo Rondinone's 2001 exhibition Slow Graffiti consisted of two new works. The exhibition space was dominated by a tessellated mirror partition (5 x 5 meters) which is positioned in a way to reflect the whole room in fragments, or rather to display a distorted picture of the room in which the sculpture, a clown figure made of polyester, leans passively against the wall.

    Integrated into the partition there were four loudspeakers playing a dialogue typical of Rondinone. To be heard is a woman's voice from the left and a man's voice from the right channel. The Beckett-like one-minute dialogue of the two voices talking at cross-purposes, fitted together to make a loop, expresses a depressing purposelessness, regarding content as well as formal aspects.

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Messages from Home – A Recipe from Tao Hui

    Messages from Home – A Recipe from Tao Hui

    Under the heading Messages from Home artists are sharing videos from their (temporary) studios or homes.⁠

     

    Here, Tao Hui shares a recipe of his take on a Chinese-style ice plant salad!

     

    See the full recipe here!

  • The Reading Corner with Gabriel Kuri pt.2

    The Reading Corner with Gabriel Kuri pt.2

    Gabriel Kuri, Reduce to Improper Fraction, 2018. 32 x 24 cm. Published by Three Star Books, Paris

     

    "I love books. By making my own, I learned that they do not have to be second to nor a derivative of my sculptural practice. Whether they are linked to a body or period of work, or exist completely independently, I always make an effort for them to have a life of their own. Books are material memory and register, key concepts in my understanding of what art is and what art can do. Books allow me to see my work as a collection of images. Images as pieces of evidence, metaphors, or signs, or simply—but no less importantly—as an essay of colour. I can see my practice through the narrative resulted from turning pages, which is quite different to pacing around a space.⁠

    Books have clear boundaries of size, format, material and binding that I always find helpful rather than limiting. I like to look at my practice through the limited structure of a book format. This shift of mind frame and optics is always helpful and never constraining. After the visible choices of colour, paper and layout in a few of my books, I guess one can see an inclination towards an aesthetics that embraces ordering and didactic principles. Making books is methodical, like my work. The methodology, the technique and of course the teamwork they involve, give me great pleasure, topped by the always welcome sense of surprise of finally holding the embodiment of an idea. I love it that books are mostly consumed intimately. And of course, I love paper." – Gabriel Kuri

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 1830

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 1830

    Exhibition view: Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 183, Esther Schipper, Berlin⁠⠀
    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In 2016, Esther Schipper presented two men contemplating the moon 1830, Ugo Rondinone’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery. 

     

    Taken from a painting by Caspar David Friedrich, the exhibition’s title makes manifest Rondinone’s long-standing indebtedness both to the iconography and philosophy of German Romanticism. “The German Romantic movement was the first to blur the line between reality and illusion. In this sense I’m very attached to the idea of art and art making as an environment that is itself outside of time and inaccessible to a linear logic.“ (The Brooklyn Rail, 2013).

     

    Rondinone modified the exhibition space to create a self-contained environment: new walls cover the existing windows. The works themselves index architectural barriers between outside and inside—a monumental new series of aluminum-cast windows, a large-scale brick-wall painting and a new series of concrete sculptures cast from the corners of urban buildings—collectively comprising the space of an inner world. 

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.3

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.3

    Welcome to the next instalment of the series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

     

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track: 

     

    - mollusks galore

    - lock up your wedges

    - everything’s sorted

    - no Marie Kondo

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Messages from Home – Tao Hui

    Messages from Home – Tao Hui

    Under the heading Messages from Home artists are sharing videos from their (temporary) studios or homes.

     

    Here, Tao Hui shares snapshots of his life from his hometown, Yunyang, Chongqing, as well as his journey back to Beijing.

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, primal

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, primal

    Exhibition view: Ugo Rondinone, primal, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2013

    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In the next instalment of our team's favorite exhibitions from the history of the gallery, Tara K.Reddi, Senior Sales Director, shares why Ugo Rondinone’s 2013 exhibition primal stands out for her:

     

    "In 2013 for the exhibition of Ugo Rondinone’s primal the gallery space which was then at Schoeneberger Ufer became the stage for a series of new sculptures by Ugo Rondinone: 34 cast bronze horses, each individual in their form and size. The space was transformed with the installation of plywood flooring spread across the rooms of the gallery, uniting the space and introducing an active natural element into the white-cube environment. The white washed windows diffused the daylight and isolated the exhibition from the world outside. Suspended translucent discs of stained-glass clocks hung over the window panes. These colored, perfectly divided stained glass clock-faces, stripped of their hands, augmented the impression of an isolated environment, arrested in time and space.⁠

     

    The gallery, appeared to be transformed into a time capsule, occupied by small cast bronze horses not more than 20 cm in height, each of them spread across the wood flooring and each facing in a different direction. Each horse was modelled in clay by the artist and then cast in bronze leaving the surface raw and unfinished after the casting. Both the uniqueness and the rough, hand-made character of the sculptures are emphasized by the titles given to each of the works, introducing a romantic undertone to the exhibition. The horses “names” rather than “titles”, refer to primordial natural phenomena: the lava, the cosmos, the foliage, the sunrise etc."⁠⠀

     

    See inside the exhibition here.

  • Behind the Scenes – Jac Leirner

    Behind the Scenes – Jac Leirner

    Jac Leirner has been working from her home in Sao Paulo on a new body of work. Fascinated by often overlooked objects and materials, she recently embraced pens from museums, airlines, and hotels, which had been left aside until the last couple of weeks, creating humorous and peculiar sculptures. Clay forms the base of several of these new pieces and is embedded with pen tops, springs, and cartridges.

     

    Here, Jac reminds us that there are inherent, magical qualities even in the most seemingly banal of materials. Along with artist Adriano Costa, the #quarantineshow project was launched on Instagram, and every single day they each post a new work. Follow Jac Leirner (@jacleirner) and Adriano Costa (@adrianocostaluis) to visit their everyday #quarentineshow

  • Journey Through the Gallery – General Idea, ¥en Boutique

     Journey Through the Gallery – General Idea, ¥en Boutique

    On the occasion of the re-launch of our website with extensive archive material celebrating over 230 exhibitions in 30 years, over the next weeks we will be sharing archival material from some of our past exhibitions!⁠

     

    To begin, we're starting with General Idea's ¥en Boutique exhibition from 1989.⁠

     

    Under the guise of pseudonyms, 3 Canadian artists called AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal work together in the group 'General Idea'.

     

    Read more here

     

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.2

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.2

    Welcome to the second instalment of our new series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

     

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track: 

     

    1. Kids are frequent inspiration⁠

    2. Plants have been art too⁠

    3. The studio has a proper name⁠

    4. I... I... I…⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Connections – Gabriel Kuri

    Connections – Gabriel Kuri

    "Looking at the bookshelf across my table I noticed Gabriel Kuri’s catalogue Sorted/Resorted published for his Wiels exhibition. Home office has advantages and disadvantages. As work is for the most part done remotely, on a computer far from the offices, my surroundings have become richer, alive. All the objects collected in more than a decades start to speak again.

     

    I like to listen to these objects – to reconnect with the reality in which I found them. It is something I’ve always liked since I was going to the beach in summer: I found the things people left in the sand very fascinating – especially because they were also completely out of context. It was an idiosyncratic place, a desert land.

     

    When I met Gabriel in 2015 for his most recent solo exhibition at the gallery, this sense of research was activated in the same way. Among the works he made, there was a series of sculptures that were hosting found objects. In the heat of the summer, I was looking for a coffee cup, the one you use to take the coffee with you, and you realize that a plain one, the one that contains just the right sense he was looking for did not exist in Kreuzberg, at least in the surrounding 10 blocks or so of his studio at the time.

     

    This research became a way to map the city and ordering a coffe-to-go was no longer about the taste of the coffee but about the shape of the cup." – Emiliano Pistacchi

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Gabriel Kuri, carbon index compost copy

    Journey Through the Gallery – Gabriel Kuri, carbon index compost copy

     

    In the second installment of our team's favorite exhibitions from the history of the gallery, Andrea Rossetti, photographer and dear friend, speaks about why the 2011 Gabriel Kuri exhibition carbon index compost copy is particularly special to him.⁠

     

    “This was the very first exhibition I documented at Esther Schipper, so I have very special feelings when I think about it and remember the installations and artworks very vividly. It was also the very first show at the Schöneberger Ufer location, and I like the idea that both myself and the gallery have a shared milestone together.”

     

    In carbon index compost copy Gabriel Kuri fused formal and material aspects in a dichotomy of physical shape, object nature, and reduction. The work incorporated a complex combination of minimalist formal language and veiled biographical reference into a very personal and often poetic discourse. Contemporary references of mundane applications, casually dispersed among the work, such as bank notes, plastic bags, official queuing tickets linked his timeless objects to the contemporary universe as well as creating a critical reference to current value systems.

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.1

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.1

    A paintbrush, a camera, a robot, disregarded doorstops or even a ouija board – how much can you tell from an artist by what’s in their studio? We’re putting your knowledge to the test in this new series where our artists open the doors and invite you to work out whose studio you’re peering into…⁠

     

    To help you out, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track.

     

    1. Carp skeletons have featured in work in past.

    2. A lot of stretching is done here

    3. Lives in Germany⁠

    4. Recent fondness for the color grey⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Pierre Huyghe, Influants

    Journey Through the Gallery – Pierre Huyghe, Influants

    Exhibition view: Pierre Huyghe, Influants, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2011⁠⠀
    © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020⁠
    Photos © Andrea Rossetti

     

    We’d like to take you on a journey through the history of the gallery.

     

    Each week we will be sharing moments from Esther Schipper’s 30 year history that are personal favourites from the team. Founded in in Cologne in 1989, the gallery celebrated its 30th anniversary last year, and to mark this occasion we have relaunched our website with extensive archive material, celebrating over 230 exhibitions in 30 years.

     

    The first to be featured is, Pierre Huyghe’s 2011 Influants, chosen by Marek Obara, Associate Director. “It was an exhibition constructed of seemingly simple means, but at the same time related the inside to the outside within the context of an exhibition.⁠"

     

    See inside the exhibition here

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