Frieze London 2019

Frieze London 2019

October 1 – 13, 2019

Esther Schipper is happy to launch its first Online Viewing Room on the occasion of Frieze London 2019. 

Get an in-depth view into the artists' practice and the works presented at Frieze London with exclusive content. The first iteration features a presentation of our curated booth with works by Angela Bulloch, Ceal Floyer, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Ann Veronica Janssens, Isa Melsheimer, Prabhavathi Meppayil, Karin Sander, Julia Scher, and Hito Steyerl. 

Alongside major new productions by the gallery artists—some of them drawn from recent institutional exhibitions such as Power Plants, Hito Steyerl’s solo project for the Serpentine Galleries—our booth will also feature important historical works. Among them a re-enactment of Julia Scher’s 1989-90 installation Occupational Placement, and Ann Veronica Janssens’ Bike, a bicycle with engraved aluminum wheel rims, originally created for Light Games, her solo exhibition at the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin in 2001.

  • ANGELA BULLOCH Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    ANGELA BULLOCH

    The work of Angela Bulloch (b. 1966) spans many media, manifesting her interest in systems, patterns and rules, as well as her preoccupation with the history of shapes and human interaction. Her series of Night Sky works, begun in 2008 on occasion of "theanyspacewhatever" at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, depicts existing constellations from a perspective other than Earth, simulated with a 3D stellar cartography program.

  • Angela Bulloch, Night Sky: Saturn South.12, 2019, LED lights, felt, aluminum, 198 x 264 cm. Photo © Eberle & Eisfeld
    • Angela Bulloch Night Sky: Saturn South.12, 2019 LED lights, felt, aluminum 198 x 264 cm (78 x 104 in)
      Angela Bulloch
      Night Sky: Saturn South.12, 2019

      LED lights, felt, aluminum

      198 x 264 cm (78 x 104 in)
       
       
  • Angela Bulloch, Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12, 2008. Exhibition view: theanyspacewhatever, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2008. Photo © David Heald
  • "I think about scale from a human point of view. Scale is always relative to something, and when I conceive of works, I do like to keep in mind the viewer or the audience. If the work has an architectural scale, I also consider that the work is visible from farther away. If the scale is bigger, then the distance from which the work can be seen usually comes into play."

     

    — Angela Bulloch, in conversation with Suzanne Cotter, Euclid in Europe, Hatje Cantz Verlag, Berlin, 2019

  • CEAL FLOYER Photo © Hugo Glendinning

    CEAL FLOYER

    Ceal Floyer’s work often uses everyday but generally overlooked objects or images to introduce defamiliarizing and somewhat startling moments into the spectator’s experience of a space. Slight alterations to found objects that are usually familiar from everyday experiences (a hairbrush, the sign for an emergency exit, or the projection of an image of a nail, for instance) create often surprising interventions that heighten the awareness of our surroundings.

  • Ceal Floyer, No Positions Available, 2007 (detail). Exhibition view: Ceal Floyer, 2008, Esther Schipper, Berlin. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Nick Ash
  • No Positions Available is a site-specific installation using signs usually employed in shop windows to indicate the status of employment opportunities: on one side they read "No Position Available", on the other "Help Wanted."

     

    Only the side with "No Position Available" is visible to the viewer. The signs are crammed to fill one wall with the smallest possible distance between them, thus rendering the sign's meaning literal in relation to space, as almost the entirety of the surface is covered. The number of signs depends on the size of the wall.

  • Ceal Floyer, No Positions Available, 2007 (detail). Exhibition view: Ceal Floyer, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2008. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Michael Trier

    "Ceal Floyer’s work is an invitation to notice the intricacies and absurdities of the world. An object will give her an idea – and act as a starting point to subvert its behaviour."


    — Hussein Chalayan, Wallpaper, 2019

  • DOMINIQUE GONZALEZ-FOERSTER Photo © Fred Ernst

    DOMINIQUE GONZALEZ-FOERSTER

    One of the most important and influential artists of her generation, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster (b. 1965) was one of the first to focus on the exhibition itself as an artistic medium. Her particular interest in space, alongside a preoccupation with literature, cinema, media, and technology has resulted in a uniquely cross-disciplinary practice, though her work primarily takes the form of environments, film and most recently, performance – or what she terms, apparitions.

     

  • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Untitled (Mobile), 2011 (detail). © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Christoph Wiesner
    • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster Untitled (Mobile), 2011 Book, quartz sand Dimensions variable (sand pile 60 cm high approx. ) (23 5/8 in)
      Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster
      Untitled (Mobile), 2011
      Book, quartz sand
      Dimensions variable (sand pile 60 cm high approx. ) (23 5/8 in)

    In Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster's works, elements are often used metonymically. Beaches for example, to which the sand may be referring, constitute transitional spaces, between horizon and landscape or city. As places, they evoke the sensation of tropicality, where time may break free and social relations are blurred.

  • Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Bibliothèque clandestine, 2013, (detail) and Philippe Parreno, Secret Bookcase Door, 2005/2013 (detail). Exhibition view: Philippe Parreno: Anywhere, Anywhere Out of the World, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2013. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    "I realized that my obsession with literature, and maybe with my place in literature, is to transfer some aspect of literature into space, there is a possibility of literature that is beyond print and paper, and probably this is where I hope to be."

     

    — Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, 2008

  • ANN VERONICA JANSSENS Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    ANN VERONICA JANSSENS

    Ann Veronica Janssens’ (b. 1956) work foregrounds the body’s perception of the world and itself in it. She often uses light, natural optical phenomena or glass as a medium. Beautifully made, her works exude the impression of great simplicity yet create vivid experiences of the act of seeing, evoking a heightened awareness of the changeability and fleetingness of the individual perception.

  • Ann Veronica Janssens, Bike, 2001. Exhibition view: Light Games, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin, 2001. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Ann Veronica Janssens
  • A bicycle with brushed aluminum wheel caps is available to visitors. The reflection of natural light on the wheels creates convex, mobile cones of light, reflecting the surrounding environment in movement. 

  • Ann Veronica Janssens, Bike, 2001. Exhibition view: Ann Veronica Janssens, Kiasma, Helsinki, 2019. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Finnish National Gallery (FNG) / Petri Virtanen

    "By pushing back the limits of perception, by rendering visible the invisible, [my] experiences act as passages from one reality to another. It’s a question of thresholds between two states of perception, between shadow and light, the defined and the undefined... While cycling, for example, one cleaves the air, one can become fully conscious of this breaking through the transparent materiality of the light and air."


    — Ann Veronica Janssens, 2001

  • https://channel.louisiana.dk/video/ann-veronica-janssens-passion-light
  • ISA MELSHEIMER Photo © Alberto Novelli

    ISA MELSHEIMER

    Known for her engagement with the history of architectural styles—especially the legacy of Modernism and 1950s–70s examples of concrete architecture—Isa Melsheimer’s (b. 1968) works are expressions of her intense research as well as formal investigations. The artist acts as archeologist of often forgotten or neglected buildings, recreating their distinctive shapes both from her study and from her vivid re-imagining of the forms and the spirit of the structures. The shift of scale inherent in the artist’s allusion to architectural structures often lets the works, made from poured concrete, appear as benches, stool-like objects, tiered steps or hollow containers that sometimes double as sites of constructed exotic vegetation. A new body of work, her glazed ceramics find another kind of representation of architectural structures that depart in scale, material and color from the sources.

  • Isa Melsheimer, Walherz, 2018. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Jens Weyers

    “The small heart sculptures hold their own as sassy, rosy creatures; one of them is set upright like a nude, positively obscenely posing beauty.

     

    A gaze fired by one’s imagination that slides over the monstrosity follows the rises, layers, chasms, and trenches of a landscape.

     

    Viewed from a different perspective, one believes to be looking at an amorphous creature with lappets and wrinkles, with swelling forms, lewdly sprouting tubes, crust, and severed tentacles.”


    — Annett Reckert, 2019

    • Isa Melsheimer Walherz, 2018 Ceramic, glaze 80 x 120 x 80 cm (31 1/2 x 47 1/4 x 31 1/2 in)
      Isa Melsheimer
      Walherz, 2018
      Ceramic, glaze
      80 x 120 x 80 cm (31 1/2 x 47 1/4 x 31 1/2 in)
  • Isa Melsheimer, Walherz, 2018 (detail). Photo © Jens Weyers
  • PRABHAVATHI MEPPAYIL Photo © Prabhavathi Meppayil

    PRABHAVATHI MEPPAYIL

    Born in 1965 to a family of goldsmiths, Prabhavathi Meppayil transposes in her works the techniques and materials associated with this ancestral savoir-faire into a contemporary plastic language that belongs to the modernist canon, whether by embedding copper wires—and more rarely remnants of gold or silver—in layers of white gesso, or by marking its surface with tools traditionally used by goldsmiths. She works on the technical dimension of the artistic practice, focusing on materials and instruments.

  • “The panels filled with tool marks [are] the abstraction of the tapping sound of the tool.”


    — Prabhavathi Meppayil

  • Prabhavathi Meppayil, se/hundred and five, 2017 (detail). Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  • KARIN SANDER Photo © Jens Ziehe

    KARIN SANDER

    Karin Sander (B. 1957) works with situations, their social and historical contexts, involving interventions in existing structures and institutions. The medium the work is realized in is painting, sculpture, electronic media, science, architecture; in brief: each medium is available for working out its specific potential. The intersection of work, recipient and institution, of what is found and what is added, of presence and absence, is emphasized and exhibited. 

  • Karin Sander, Identities on Display, 2013. Exhibition view: Pre-Show: Identities on Display, Humboldt-Lab, Berlin, 2013. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    • Karin Sander Identities on Display, 2013 Glass, wood, metal, wheels 200 x 60 x 80 cm (78 3/4 x 23 5/8 x 31 1/2 in)
      Karin Sander
      Identities on Display, 2013
      Glass, wood, metal, wheels
      200 x 60 x 80 cm (78 3/4 x 23 5/8 x 31 1/2 in)
  • Karin Sander, Identities on Display, 2011 (detail). Exhibition view: Pre-Show: Identities on Display, Humboldt-Lab, Berlin, 2013. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    "Sander does not invent; she engages with what is already there. Interacting with specific sites, histories, and social configurations, she derives her work directly from reality, which she torques with minimal interventions of great precision and clarity.

    (...) Relying on broad-based participation, Sander’s oeuvre is social in the truest sense of the word. Her works are always self-portraits—they’re just not of the artist herself."

     

    — Benjamin Paul, 2018

  • JULIA SCHER Photo © Albrecht Fuchs

    JULIA SCHER

    Emerging in the mid 1980s as a precise but playful analyst of social and technological changes, Julia Scher (b. 1954) has been dealing with video surveillance for more than 30 years. Her work addresses surveillance both as a concrete phenomenon of control, including its apparatus and architecture, as well as its impact on the private and public spheres. Very early on, her performance and video installations drew attention to the effects of increasingly ubiquitous cameras and monitors, anticipating our surveillance alienated society.

  • Julia Scher, Occupational Placement, 1989-90 (detail). Exhibition view: Occupational Placement, Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, 1989. Photo © Bill Horrigan

    “The viewing audience will be asked to consider the implication of being within an environment that, rather than being observed itself, is engaged in observing, collecting, organizing and transposing images. You look at the building – but the building looks back.”


    — Julia Scher, 1989

  • Julia Scher, Occupational Placement, 1989-90 (detail). Exhibition view: Occupational Placement, Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, 1989. Photo © Bill Horrigan
  • In Occupational Placement, images from live permanent security system cameras, temporary cameras, and prerecorded video (fake feeds) are mixed with overlays of random computer generated text, recorded and output to screens. Visitors become part of the artwork as they watch themselves on the monitors, seeing their images overlaid with such vaguely unsettling text as “you are not protected here but are being watched.”

  • HITO STEYERL Photo © Trevor Paglen

    HITO STEYERL

    Hito Steyerl (b. 1966) is aGerman filmmaker, visual artist, writer and innovator of the documentary essay film. Drawing upon topics such as media, technology and the global circulation of images, she sharpens the viewer’s perception of what is real through moving image works and installations that combine found, filmed and digitally animated footage.

  • Hito Steyerl, Power Plants, 2019 (detail). Exhibition view: 58th Venice Biennale, 2019. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  • Hito Steyerl, Power Plants, 2019 (detail). Exhibition view: Power Plants, Serpentine Galleries, London, 2019. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019. Photo © 2019 readsreads.info

    "These are video sculptures that show flowers predicted into the future by AI. These future plants do not yet exist but have medicinal and also ecological properties."

     

    — Hito Steyerl, 2019

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