Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

Esther Schipper, Berlin
November 19 – December 21, 2019
Closing in
  • Webs of At-tent(s)ion, 2018. Exhibition view: ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    Esther Schipper is pleased to announce Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, Tomás Saraceno's third solo exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition is on view from November 16 and continues through December 21, 2019.

     

    Algo-r(h)i(y)thms transforms the exhibition space into a web-like landscape of nets.

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  • Tomás Saraceno On the Disappearance of Clouds, 2019. Exhibition view: May You Live In Interesting Times, 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    Tomás Saraceno

    Tomás Saraceno’s practice is elevated by the concepts linking art, life science and the social sciences. Enmeshed at the junction of these worlds, his floating sculptures, community projects and interactive installations propose and explore new, sustainable ways of inhabiting and sensing the environment. 

     

    His oeuvre could be seen as an ongoing research, informed as much by the worlds of art and architecture than natural sciences, astrophysics and engineering.

  • Tomás Saraceno, Aerocene, Launches at White Sands, New Mexico, United States, 2016. CC BY-SA 4.0 by Aerocene Foundation

  • Spider/Web Pavilion 7, 2019. Exhibition view: May You Live In Interesting Times, 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    His profound interest in spiders and their webs led to the formation of the Arachnophilia team at Studio Tomás Saraceno, engendering the creation of Arachnophilia.net and the Arachnomancy App. 

     

    Through these platforms, Saraceno invites people from around the globe to weave the web of interspecies understanding and take part in the challenge of Mapping Against Extinction. 

  • Webs of At-tent(s)ion, 2018. Exhibition view: ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    In the past decade, he has collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Max Planck Institute, the Nanyang Technological University, the Imperial College London and the Natural History Museum London.

     

    With an emphasis on collaborative interaction, he also became the first person to scan, reconstruct and reimagine spiders’ weaved spatial habitats, and possesses the only three-dimensional spider web collection in existence.

  • Webs of At-tent(s)ion, 2018. Exhibition view: ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    Webs of At-tent(s)ion, 2018. Exhibition view: ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    • Tomás Saraceno Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018 Rope, contact microphones, hardware, passive speakers, amplifiers, shakers, subwoofers 18 nets, variable dimensions Room size: 375 sq m, H7 x L25 x W15 m
      Tomás Saraceno
      Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018

      Rope, contact microphones, hardware, passive speakers, amplifiers, shakers, subwoofers
      18 nets, variable dimensions
      Room size: 375 sq m, H7 x L25 x W15 m

    Algo-r(h)i(y)thms is Tomás Saraceno's third solo exhibition with the gallery.
     
    In Spanish, “algo” means “something.” “Rhythm” comes from the Greek rhythmos, meaning "movement marked by the regulated succession of strong and weak elements, or of opposite or different conditions." 

     

    Though rhythm is both biological and inherent, theorized as evolutionarily instinctual, relating in human history to the speeds of the human heartbeat, gait, and emotional affect, our contemporary moment operates at a tempo artificially imposed rather than intuitively felt. Algo-r(h)i(y)thms then presents an urgent invitation to attune to our sym(bio)poetic futures, the radical reciprocity of all things, both living and nonliving, through a vibrational language.

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    In the artist’s words, "organisms are not atomistic individuals but hybrid assemblages… each body is a ‘nested ecology’ linked to others in complex ways. By thinking like this, we might notice our interconnectedness with other beings, other elements; how we might cooperate across species boundaries and how we might live and thrive together on a shared planet.”

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  • Galaxies Forming along Filaments, like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web. Exhibition view: Fare Mondi – Making Worlds, 53rd International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, Venice, 2009. Photo © Alessandro Coco

    A first iteration of the work under the title Galaxies Forming along Filaments, like Droplets along the Strands of a Spider’s Web was presented in 2009 during the 53rd Biennale di Venezia, Fare Mondi – Making Worlds, curated by Daniel Birnbaum. 

     

    Bruno Latour described it as, “a potent attempt at shaping today’s political ecology—by extending former natural forces to address the human political problem of forming livable communities.”

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

    In 2018, the work was sonified as Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, conceived for the artist’s major solo exhibition, ON AIR, Carte Blanche to Tomás Saraceno, curated by Rebecca Lamarche-Vadel at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris.

     

    This third iteration is an invitation to play the web as a spider might, gently touching, sliding and stridulating within a system of amplified strings.

     

    The interconnected sonic landscape reminds us that all our actions produce resonances affecting everything around us, across scales.

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  •  

    Elemental vibration has a periodicity or frequency of anything from microseconds to several seconds or, at the most extreme, even over many years. Similarly, each of the intersecting nodes within Algo-r(h)i(y)thms refers to the different reverberation frequencies of micro and macroscopic phenomena.

     

    Of the 3.4 kilometers of 1–2.5 milli-meter black cord arranged in complex clusters, a 25 cm diameter net, 58-178 Hz (Argiope keyserlingi Courtship / Emitted Frequency), borrows its name from the peak frequencies of courtship signals produced by an orb-weaving spider.

  • Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
    Algo‐r(h)i(y)thms, 2018. Exhibition view: Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti
  • Nets with broader diameters draw upon the vibrational rates of more monumental matter, such as the 140 cm diameter net 0.61 GHz (RXCJ2003.5-2323 / Radio Halo)—a halo generated by ultrarelativistic electrons surrounding this distant galaxy cloud.

  • The vibrating world of spiders can be further explored at Arachnophilia.net, a living archive of coexistences developed by Studio Tomás Saraceno and the Arachnophilia team, and through the Arachnomancy App.

Viewing Room
Search

Tomás Saraceno – Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

Welcome to the Tomás Saraceno Online Viewing Room. Please provide your email to enter.

Receive newsletters *
By sharing your details you agree to our Terms and Conditions, and will receive our newsletters.