theanyspacewhatever

with Angela Bulloch and Liam Gillick
October 24, 2008 – January 7, 2009

Liam Gillick

theanyspacewhatever Signage System, 2008

Powder-coated, water-cut aluminum pieces

 

Photo @ the artist

Liam Gillick

theanyspacewhatever Signage System, 2008

Powder-coated, water-cut aluminum pieces

 

Photo @ the artist

Liam Gillick

theanyspacewhatever Signage System, 2008

Powder-coated, water-cut aluminum pieces

 

Photo @ the artist

Liam Gillick

Audioguide Bench, Guggenheim, NY, 2008 

Dyed medium-density fibreboard

 

Photo @ the artist

Liam Gillick

Audioguide Bench, Guggenheim, NY, 2008 

Dyed medium-density fibreboard

 

Photo @ the artist

Angela Bulloch

Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12, 2008

Light-emitting diodes, neoprene, animated program, control gear, structural elements, power supply and various cables
 
The Night Sky works by Angela Bulloch show a map of the sky and is a complex computer-controlled LED installation. The concept is based on a space travel simulation software called Celestia, a program used in planetariums. The view is from an extraterrestrial position. The lightning of the stars and planets is based on algorithms and commands that the artists programmed.
 
Photo © David Heald

Angela Bulloch

Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12, 2008

Light-emitting diodes, neoprene, animated program, control gear, structural elements, power supply and various cables
 
The Night Sky works by Angela Bulloch show a map of the sky and is a complex computer-controlled LED installation. The concept is based on a space travel simulation software called Celestia, a program used in planetariums. The view is from an extraterrestrial position. The lightning of the stars and planets is based on algorithms and commands that the artists programmed.
 
Photo © David Heald

Angela Bulloch

Firmamental Night Sky: Oculus.12, 2008

Light-emitting diodes, neoprene, animated program, control gear, structural elements, power supply and various cables
 
The Night Sky works by Angela Bulloch show a map of the sky and is a complex computer-controlled LED installation. The concept is based on a space travel simulation software called Celestia, a program used in planetariums. The view is from an extraterrestrial position. The lightning of the stars and planets is based on algorithms and commands that the artists programmed.
 
Photo © David Heald

theanyspacewhatever

with Angela Bulloch and Liam Gillick
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
October 24, 2008 – January 7, 2009
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