Join The Dots And Make A Point

Gabriel Kuri
June 11 – August 6, 2010

Fountain, 2010 (foreground)

Rocks, paper 

By means of minimal gestures, Kuri draws attention to the weight of banal everyday items in our lives and at the same time, confronts the spectator with the plurality of meanings that belong to these everyday objects.

 

Untitled, 2009–10 (background)
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Untitled (Ticket Roll), 2010 

3 marble slabs, ticket roll

With this simple sculptural gesture, Kuri draws attention to the sheer weight of the marble, pressing down on a ticket roll. Opposed to that is the fragility of the balanced slabs, their collapse inherent in the sculpture.

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Exhibition view

Join The Dots And Make A Point, 2010
Kunstverein Freiberg

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Untitled, 2009–10 
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Donation Box, 2010

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Donation Box, 2010

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Photo © Marc Doradtzillo

Join The Dots And Make A Point

Gabriel Kuri
Kunstverein Freiberg
June 11 – August 6, 2010
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On the occasion of his first institutional exhibition in Germany, Gabriel Kuri has created four new groups of works, which provide an insight into different aspects of his practice. Accordingly, Kuri is showing sculptures and installation; all of them are made out of found materials or industrially manufactured products, including marble slabs, sand, paper, cigarette butts, or body care products. A precise and deliberate positioning and a surprising casualness always characterize the presentation of his objects in the exhibition. With their humor and lightness of touch, his works level criticism as well as political, economic, and social conditions. In the sense of an extended notion of sculpture, he shifts the boundaries of art and the everyday, as the viewers and the everyday become part of the aesthetic form.

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