Join The Dots And Make A Point

Gabriel Kuri
September 4 – November 1, 2010

Exhibition view

Join The Dots And Make A Point, 2010
Bielefelder Kunstverein

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Donation Box, 2010 (left)

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Untitled (T), 2010 (right)
2 marble slabs, 1 banknote

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (T), 2010
2 marble slabs, 1 banknote

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Donation Box, 2010

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Donation Box, 2010

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Donation Box, 2010

Sand, cigarette butts, coins

This sculpture borrows from the narrative elements of our everyday lives, as a result of specific places or social structures. The experience of the commonplace is fathomed beyond the figurative and liberates the abstract work from its formal severity in a humorous way.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (Ticket Roll), 2010 (left)

3 marble slabs, ticket roll

With this simple sculptural gesture, Kuri draws attention to the sheer weight of the marble, pressing down on a ticket roll. Opposed to that is the fragility of the balanced slabs, their collapse inherent in the sculpture.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (Ticket Roll), 2010 

3 marble slabs, ticket roll

With this simple sculptural gesture, Kuri draws attention to the sheer weight of the marble, pressing down on a ticket roll. Opposed to that is the fragility of the balanced slabs, their collapse inherent in the sculpture.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (Complimentary cornice and intervals), 2009
Six marble slabs, courtesy cosmetics

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Exhibition view

Join The Dots And Make A Point, 2010
Bielefelder Kunstverein

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (Complimentary cornice and intervals), 2009 
Six marble slabs, courtesy cosmetics

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled (Flama), 2010 (left)

Two marble slabs

 

Untitled, 2009–10 (right)
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled, 2009–10 
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled, 2009–10
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled, 2009–10 
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Untitled, 2009–10 
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Fountain, 2010 (foreground)

Rocks, paper 

By means of minimal gestures, Kuri draws attention to the weight of banal everyday items in our lives and at the same time, confronts the spectator with the plurality of meanings that belong to these everyday objects.

 

Untitled, 2009–10 (background)
Bird spike, collected receipts, sales tickets, bills, vouchers

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Fountain, 2010 

Rocks, paper 

By means of minimal gestures, Kuri draws attention to the weight of banal everyday items in our lives and at the same time, confronts the spectator with the plurality of meanings that belong to these everyday objects.

 

Photo © Phillipp Ottendörfer

Join The Dots And Make A Point

Gabriel Kuri
Bielefelder Kunstverein
September 4 – November 1, 2010
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For the occasion of his first institutional exhibition in Germany, Gabriel Kuri (*1970 in Mexico City) has created four new groups of works, which provide an insight into different artistic aspects of his work. Accordingly, Kuri is showing sculptures and installations in the Bielefelder Kunstverein, all of them made out of found materials like industrially manufactured products, including marble, sand, paper, cigarettes or bodycare products.

 

Gabriel Kuri works with the mediums of installation, sculpture, collage and photography. His source material often derives from simple mass-produced objects and throwaway products. Everyday things like shopping bags or packaging, but also building material like concrete or marble surface in room-filling installations and sculptures. These are mostly liberated from their functionality, but also from the circumstances of their past, are removed form the regular cycle of consumption and preserved in the work. Alongside the fundamental aesthetic questions of material, form and color, Kuri is concerned with reality; using lowly industrial materials is reminiscent of the artistic concepts of Minimalism, of Nouveau Réalisme or of Arte Povera.

 

The presentation of his objects and how they are set out in space is always characterized by a conscious positioning and a surprising casualness at the same time. With their vast lightness and humor, his works in this way level criticism at political, economic and social conditions too. In the sense of an extended notion of sculpture, he shifts the boundaries of art and the everyday, has the everyday and the viewers become part of the aesthetic form. A poetic integration distinguishing Kuri’s works arises by means of contrasting materials and forms, the combining of found objects and constructed ones and the opposing of value to valuelessness.

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