Kola

Matti Braun
February 6 – April 26, 2009
Untitled, 2007 (left)
Handpainted cotton, metal strap
 
The Alien (London), 2007 (through the doorway)
Inkjetprints on paper
The set of photographs depicts the staging of Matti Braun's play The Alien in London. The play refers to the screenplay by the same name from 1967 by the Indian film director Satyajit Ray. 
 
Untitled, 2007 (right)
Concrete, metal, plastic

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Untitled, 2007 (left)
Handpainted cotton, metal strap
 
S.R., 2003-2005 (through the doorway)
Foil, water, tree discs

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

Untitled, 2007 (right)

Handpainted cotton, metal strap

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

S.R., 2003-2005
Foil, water, tree discs

The pond takes as its point of departure the opening sequence of Satyajit Rays' not implemented script The Alien, in which an alien's spaceship lands on a lotus blossom-pond and sinks to the ground. Beyond its actual significance as a possible filmset, the pond is to be seen as an accessible projection screen for the versatile associations Braun sets up between script, author and other protagonists and objects that are part of this trilogy.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Various butterfly display cases

 

These display cases resemble the ones seen in natural history museums, which have the purpose of researching different species and demonstrating the systematical perception of the world. The aspect of the serial character was taken to extremes by a mirrored floor. The deeper power of the butterfly show cases lies in the mirroring of our own perception and desires.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Untitled, 2008 (foreground)
Wood, plaster, rigid foam

This work is based on the architectural ground plan of the antique water installation in Urfa in Southeast Anatolia, which is connected with the carp pond of the city.

 

Özurfa, 2008 (on back wall)
Offset prints
The series of 13 offset prints displays various themes that Matti Braun has featured in their cultural and geographic context in relation to his research on the city of Urfa. Other prints refer to archaeologically important sites or technical achievements that are directly connected to Urfa’s geographical location.
 
In the middleground:
Various vitrines displaying objects related to Matti Braun's research on the city of Urfa.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

From front to back:

 

Untitled, 2008
25 firestones, arrowheads, hand-axes, graters, vitrine (copper, glass, wood, cloth)
 
Untitled, 2008
Four doves, argent headdress, 3 silver footrings, vitrine (copper, glass, wood, fabric)
At all times, the dove had a prominent role as message bearer. To this day particularly beautiful and successful doves, bred and tamed in the Orient since the 7th century, receive jewellery in the form of ornamental rings from their breeders, which pierces their wings. 
 
Untitled, 2008
3 carp skeletons, vitrine (copper, glass, wood, fabric)
Three carp skeletons are arranged on the inside surface parallel to each other. The white bones exert an eerie presence, recalling the fishes they one were. The case's copper is also in reference to excavation sites near Urfa where very early use of tools, arms and jewelry made from the material was found.
 
Untitled, 2008
11 antique (Roman) glass vases, vitrine (copper, glass, fabric)

The vases originate in the 1st to 4th century AD. For many centuries, the area of Urfa was a major crossroad for trade, culture and religion. Many archeologists regard this place as the "cradle of civilisation". The provenience of the vases is the Collection Peter C. Hammelsbeck in Cologne. 

 

Yol, 2008
7 film reels (complete copy of Yol in screening order), vitrine (copper, glass, fabric)

Anatolian filmmaker Yilmaz Güney won the 1982 Cannes Palme d'Or for this film. Güney was a popular actor in action films before his directorial work which included sharp social commentary got him arrested several times and eventually imprisoned.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Bali, 2001
Mirror fragments
Bali is a large-scale rectangular wall piece made of multiple small mirrored squares of 2 x 2 cm. The number of pieces depends on the size and the intended location. Windows, other light sources, the function of the space, etc. have to be taken into consideration when positioning the piece.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Bali, 2001
Mirror fragments
Bali is a large-scale rectangular wall piece made of multiple small mirrored squares of 2 x 2 cm. The number of pieces depends on the size and the intended location. Windows, other light sources, the function of the space, etc. have to be taken into consideration when positioning the piece.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

All plates:
Untitled (Keramikteller), 1996
Ceramic plate

The plates are made from majolica, a ceramic which is glazed with a white pewter base. Their production is very elaborate, and pottery made in this way can last for centuries. Matti Braun frequently integrates tangible objects from everyday life into his installations and places them in a specific historical and geographical context.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009
Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009
Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009

Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

All wall hangings:

Untitled, 2003
Silkscreen on fabric, colored by hand
Woven fabrics have a long tradition in India and Indonesia. Historically, many Patolas were designed and made entirely for export, their geometric patterns catering for the specific tastes of the country that they were being sent to. Matti Braun’s fascination for the Patolas lies within their very complex method of production, which is supposed to have magical powers, and especially in the symbiosis of highbrow processes, technical perfection and mystical inscription.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Untitled, 2003

Silkscreen on fabric, colored by hand
Woven fabrics have a long tradition in India and Indonesia. Historically, many Patolas were designed and made entirely for export, their geometric patterns catering for the specific tastes of the country that they were being sent to. Matti Braun’s fascination for the Patolas lies within their very complex method of production, which is supposed to have magical powers, and especially in the symbiosis of highbrow processes, technical perfection and mystical inscription.

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009
Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009

Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Exhibition view

Kola, 2009

Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz

 

Photo © Stefan Altenburger

Kola

Matti Braun
Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein, Vaduz
February 6 – April 26, 2009
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The Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein presented a large-scale museum exhibition of works by Matti Braun. His works enable the viewer to become immersed in atmospheric spaces characterized by an eminently clear and precise aesthetic. With the exhibition title Kola, Matti Braun takes us into the Arctic tundra, to the northern shores of the White Sea. On Russia’s Kola peninsula, near the Norwegian and Finnish borders, unique rock formations have remained virtually unchanged for more than two and a half thousand million years. In 1970, the peninsula was therefore chosen as the site for the so-called Kola Superdeep Borehole. By 1994, it had been drilled to a depth of more than 12,000 meters, making it the deepest borehole in the world. At the same time, Kola is threatened by the environmental impact of radioactive waste, both from civilian power plants and from the spent fuel rods of Soviet nuclear submarines.


Both the motif and the title that introduce the exhibition sum up, in a nutshell, Matti Braun’s artistic approach and his profound interest in atmospheric relationships. Each object and each material used points beyond itself, catching the viewers’ attention and enticing them into a web that is rich in associative imaginative spaces.

 

In his research, Matti Braun includes historical, cultural, geographical, and biographical contexts. Facts, memories, images, and forms are woven into a complex mesh while at the same time allowing his work to be permeable. Braun is particularly interested in the paths taken by cultural exchange; he therefore interweaves heterogeneous historical and personal truths, opens and shifts standpoints, and intermingles internal and external realities.

 

On show were samples from all his work groups, ranging from smaller objects with a partly folkloric or ethnological aura, to extensive room installations, such as S.R., R.T., Ghor and Lota. The exhibition also contained conceptually related works taken from the collection of the Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein.

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