Model Studies

Thomas Demand
September 7 – October 20, 2012

From left to right:

 
Goldstein #13, 2011
Pigment print

Goldstein #08, Goldstein #90, Goldstein #98, 2011 

Pigment print, 3 prints

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction. 

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right:

 
Segel #76, 2011
Segel #25, 2011
Wood #13, 2011 

All works: pigment print

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction. 

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right: 

 

Franklyn #53, Franklyn #61, 2011
Haagen Beach #34, Haagen Beach #44, 2011 (partly hidden, back)
Both works: pigment print, 2 prints
Beyer #34, 2011
Concannon #58, 2011
Both works: pigment print

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction. 

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right:

 

Haagen Beach #34, 2011

Haagen Beach #44, 2011

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction.

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right:

 

Marina Fine Arts #37, 2011

Marina Fine Arts #23, 2011

Marina Fine Arts #31, 2011

Marina Fine Arts #91, 2011

All works: pigment print

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction. 

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right:

 

Marina Fine Arts #91, 2011

Segel #76, 2011 (through the doorway)

Segel #25, 2011

Segel #49, 2011

All works: pigment print

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction. 

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

From left to right:

 

Segel #25, 2011 

Segel #49, 2011

Both works: pigment print

The architectural models of American architect John Lautner (1911–1994) provide the starting point for the series. Lautner's study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide the artist with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction.

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Untitled, 1993
Cibachrome print face-mounted on Plexiglas

 

Photo © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Model Studies

Thomas Demand
September 7 – October 20, 2012
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Esther Schipper is pleased to present Model Studies, the fourth solo exhibition by Thomas Demand at the gallery. 

 

Model Studies is a new series of works that Demand developed during his residency at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. The extensive archive of the Institute includes the estate of the American architect John Lautner (1911–1994), whose architectural models provide the starting point for Demand‘s series. 

 

Model Studies comprises a total of 32 photographs from which a selection of individual images, as well as groups of two, three and of four, will be presented. Lautner‘s study models, which the architect used as visual aids, provide Demand with a representational basis, but can only be perceived in details of materials and shapes. Instead, the close-ups of cardboard, tar paper and foam-core panels open up photographic potential for abstraction with a nod to a modernist formal vocabulary, reflecting the link between Cubism and American art of the post-war period. At the same time, the series forms part of Demand‘s ongoing research into the construction of spaces and architecture, updating Lautner‘s visionary and often called fictional ideas.

 

In 2012 Model Studies was also shown at Nottingham Contemporary and at the International Pavilion of the Venice Biennale of Architecture, before being presented in January 2013 at the Graham Foundation in Chicago.

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