Grönlund-Nisunen

Grönlund-Nisunen
February 2 – March 2, 2013

Unstable Matter, 2013 (front)

Steel balls, aluminium, laminated wood, MDF, motors, control unit

The momentum of the little metal balls is difficult to predict: sometimes a few begin to separate from the others, almost as if the rest was hesitating, leaving or joining groups, imbuing the metal balls with a swarm-like quality. 

 

6 Solar Incidences, 2013 (back, left)

2 Solar Incidences, 2013 (back, center)

8 Solar Incidences, 2013 (back, right)

All works: Selenium toned B/W silver gelatin prints 

Referencing classic vintage photography, the silver gelatin prints of the Solar Incidences, which were hand-printed by the artists themselves, have a close affinity to both the first photographic images of the sun in astronomy and to avant-garde works of the 1920s.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Unstable Matter, 2013 (front)

Steel balls, aluminium, laminated wood, MDF, motors, control unit, car battery, charger

The momentum of the little metal balls is difficult to predict: sometimes a few begin to separate from the others, almost as if the rest was hesitating, leaving or joining groups, imbuing the metal balls with a swarm-like quality.  

 

Arrangement, 2013 (left)

Powder coated steel plate, MDF, aluminium profile, neodymium magnets 

 

Plane, 2013 (right)

Magnets, stainless steel weights, stainless steel wire, fixtures 

 

Movement, 2013 (through the doorway)

Stainless steel, glass, clock movement

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Plane, 2013

Magnets, stainless steel weights, stainless steel wire, fixtures 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Jules Racine 1448201, 2013

Heuer 7700, 2013

Zone-X, 2013

 

From back to front

All works: Stainless steel, glass, clock movement, wooden shelf 

 

The titles refer to the name of the companies producing the timepieces. The artists have removed the backing in order to reveal the mechanism inside the watch. By relatively simple but sophisticated means, using magnetism, electric currents, or simple gravitational forces, the artists create quietly evocative and formally striking works.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Spring Field, 2012 (front)

Coil springs, solenoids, control unit, electric leads, attachments 

 

Automatic Drawing I - VI, 2013 (wall)

Ink and pencil on paper

These drawings of horizontal and vertical lines create regular looking pattern but also evoke associations with architectural plans or diagrams of electrical circuitry.  

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Spring Field, 2012 (front)

Coil springs, solenoids, control unit, electric leads, attachments 

 

Automatic Drawing I - VI, 2013 (wall)

Ink and pencil on paper

These drawings of horizontal and vertical lines create regular looking pattern but also evoke associations with architectural plans or diagrams of electrical circuitry.  

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Automatic Drawing I - VI, 2013

Ink and pencil on paper 

These drawings of horizontal and vertical lines create regular looking pattern but also evoke associations with architectural plans or diagrams of electrical circuitry.  

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Grönlund-Nisunen

Grönlund-Nisunen
February 2 – March 2, 2013
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Esther Schipper is pleased to present the fourth solo exhibition of Grönlund-Nisunen with the gallery.

 

Tommi Grönlund (b. 1967) and Petteri Nisunen (b. 1962) have been working together since 1993. Technology, sound and light are the base materials of their work. The artists examine issues such as space and physical phenomena. Their sophisticated installations often play with the physical laws of nature and explore sound and space in a modest, low-tech manner. Originally trained as architects, their examination of urban/social space and nature still makes up a large part of their work. In addition to numerous solo and group exhibitions, they have also completed major commissions in public spaces.

 

In Berlin, Grönlund-Nisunen are showing new works that explore the sculptural interpretation of physical phenomena. Fundamental forces of nature such as magnetism and gravity form the starting point for this artistic exploration whose phenomenology constitutes a minimalist use of form. 

 

The first work one sees, or hears, upon entering the gallery space is Unstable Matter (2013). Several thousand steel balls have been placed on a 150 x 150 cm large metal surface, which subtly tilts from one side to the other. Depending on the inclination angle, the balls begin to roll to the lower edges, continually forming changing patterns.

 

The second work, Plane (2013), depicts the balance between gravity and attraction. A field of twenty vertical steel cables has been adapted to the gallery space. The cables run between the ceiling and the floor, but are separated in the middle. Magnets, which hold the individual cables taught, are attached to the separate ends, allowing them to nearly meet.

 

A series of black and white silver gelatin prints can be found along the walls, framing the two installations. Referencing classic vintage photography, the photographs, which were hand-printed by the artists themselves, have a close affinity to Pictorialism, but also to avant-garde works of the 1920s. They depict various constellations of a luminous, centrally photographed sphere in front of a black background. It remains open as to whether these are images of the sun or compositions with an artificial light source.

 

Spring Field (2012) consists of vertically aligned metal springs that run between the ceiling and the floor. The installation encompasses nearly the entire second room of the gallery. The springs are set in permanent oscillation through electrical impulses, accompanied by a rhythmic clacking. Here as well, the central work is accompanied by a series of drawings. Created in the tradition of architectural sketches, the pencil and ink drawings depict variations of central themes in the exhibition.

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