Über die Dünnhäutigkeit von Schwellen

Isa Melsheimer
March 12 – April 16, 2016

Exhibition view showing ceramic works on custom-made pedestals. In the foreground, in gray and red, works from the series Hausbar, loosely based on furniture by Italian designer Aldo Tura.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde IX, 2016 (detail; back)

Hyperboloïde VIII, 2016 (detail; front)

Both works: Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde VIII, 2016 (detail; front)

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Various ceramic works on custom-made pedestals (back)

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view showing ceramic works on custom-made pedestals.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Ceramic III, 2016 (back)

Ceramic IV, 2016 (center)

Ceramic V, 2016 (right)

Ceramic I, 2016 (front)

 

All works: Ceramic, glaze

These ceramics play with the dissolution of shapes, both geometric and architectural.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Ceramic I, 2016

Ceramic, glaze

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Ceramic V, 2016 (back)

Ceramic IV, 2016 (center)

Ceramic III, 2016 (front)

 

All works: Ceramic, glaze

These ceramics play with the dissolution of shapes, both geometric and architectural.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde VIII, 2016

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde VIII, 2016

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde VIII, 2016

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde IX, 2016 (detail)

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde IX, 2016 (detail)

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde IX, 2016 (detail)

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Hyperboloïde IX, 2016 (detail)

Thread, nails

 

The architectural intervention connects different rooms. The threads originate from an ornamental floral pattern created with small nails on the wooden floor. 

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Exhibition view showing Hyperboloïde IX, 2016, concrete works and gouaches

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Possibility Of A Ruin VIII, 2016

Possibility Of A Ruin IX, 2016 

Possibility Of A Ruin VI, 2016

Possibility Of A Ruin V, 2016

Possibility Of A Ruin VII, 2016

 

Five concrete works from the series Possibility Of A Ruin based on demolished Brutalist structures. Each work combines a concrete work, a delicate ceramic and a custom-made plinth.

 

Nr. 407, 2016

Gouache on paper

 

The gouache takes as point of departure a view of a since-demolished Brutalist building, the Tricorn Centre by Rodney Gordon and Owen Luder in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. Built in the mid 1960s as a large-scale community center that included shops, nightclub and parking, the structure was demolished in 2004.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Possibility Of A Ruin VI, 2016

Possibility Of A Ruin V, 2016

Possibility Of A Ruin VII, 2016

 

Three concrete works from the series Possibility Of A Ruin based on demolished Brutalist structures. Each work combines a concrete work, a delicate ceramic and a custom-made plinth. 

 

Nr. 407, 2016

Gouache on paper

 

The gouache takes as point of departure a view of a since-demolished Brutalist building, the Tricorn Centre by Rodney Gordon and Owen Luder in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. Built in the mid 1960s as a large-scale community center that included shops, nightclub and parking, the structure was demolished in 2004.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Possibility Of A Ruin VIII, 2016

Reinforced concrete, ceramic, pedestal

 

The piece combines a concrete work, a delicate ceramic and a custom-made plinth. The concrete sculpture refers to the Brutalist building, Iwata Girls High School in Oita, Japan by the famous Japanese architect Arata Isozaki.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Possibility Of A Ruin VIII, 2016 (detail)

Reinforced concrete, ceramic, pedestal

 

The piece combines a concrete work, a delicate ceramic and a custom-made plinth. The concrete sculpture refers to the Brutalist building, Iwata Girls High School in Oita, Japan by the famous Japanese architect Arata Isozaki.

 

Photo © Andrea Rossetti

Über die Dünnhäutigkeit von Schwellen

Isa Melsheimer
March 12 – April 16, 2016
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Esther Schipper is pleased to present Isa Melsheimer’s second solo exhibition with the gallery. Entitled Über die Dünnhäutigkeit von Schwellen, the exhibition includes new concrete and ceramic works. In addition to a suite of gouaches, the rooms will be altered by a network of threads addressing the changeability and fragility of space, both in general and in the context of the specific conditions of this exhibition space.

 

Known for her engagement with the history of architectural styles—especially the legacy of Modernism and of concrete constructions from the 1960s and 1970s, a style generally referred to as Brutalism—Isa Melsheimer’s works are expressions of her intense research as well as formal investigations. The artist acts as archeologist of often forgotten or neglected buildings, recreating their distinctive shapes both from her study and from her vivid re-imagining of the forms and the spirit of the structures. Even if the individual buildings are not all well known and therefore might not be immediately recognized, the formal language is familiar and has become a ubiquitous part of the urban landscape. Her work seeks to examine the connotations of the building's historical and architectural context, and the ideological connotations with which its materials, aesthetics, and functions may be imbued. The concrete works in this exhibition take as points of reference Brutalist buildings that were neither popular nor critical successes and have subsequently been demolished.

 

In her gouaches of architectural sites Isa Melsheimer constructs small autonomous worlds, seemingly detached from their real-world settings. The artist often choses black and white source material showing the building in their original condition, that is, without signs of subsequent decay or dilapidation and without later architectural or landscaping additions. Isa Melsheimer effectively reimagines the colors of the buildings and their interiors, unrestrained by the strictures of verisimilitude. The impression of these structures existing in a self-contained, timeless space is further emphasized by the fantastic elements that appear in these environments: wild animals like foxes or porcupines, clusters of brilliantly colored crystalline formations and/or extravagantly dark starry night skies.

 

Isa Melsheimer’s glazed ceramics find another kind of representation of architectural structures that depart in scale, material and color from their sources. Although their scale recalls the miniaturized and schematic appearance of preliminary architectural models, the material and colors add a fantastic, playful aspect, and even let the works appear akin to individual personages.

 

A large-scale installation using threads to create geometric shapes addressing the architectural conditions of the exhibition space will span both rooms. In 2015 Isa Melsheimer installed a similarly expansive network of threads at the Espace Culturel Louis Vuitton in Paris.

 

Both Isa Melsheimer’s object-based works and her gouaches take a certain amount of free license, sometimes containing elements of fantastic recreation, but are always infused with a deep understanding for their architectural sources.

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