Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019

Hito Steyerl
February 21 – April 14, 2019

Hito Steyerl

Abstract, 2012
Two channel HD video with sound,

Duration: 7:30 min

 

Exhibition view: Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019. Hito Steyerl, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2019

 

Photo © Andrea FranzXaver Süß / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019

Robots Today, 2016

One channel HD video

Duration: 8:02 min

 

Hell Yeah We Fuck Die, 2016

Three channel HD video installation, environment

Duration: 4:35 min

 

Exhibition view: Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019. Hito Steyerl, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2019

 

Photo © Andrea FranzXaver Süß / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019

Hell Yeah We Fuck Die, 2016

Three channel HD video installation, environment

Duration: 4:35 min

 

Exhibition view: Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019. Hito Steyerl, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2019

 

Photo © Andrea FranzXaver Süß / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019

Left:

Babenhausen, 1997

Video

Duration: 4:04 min

 

Right:

Normality 6, 1999

Beta SP

Duration: 5:10 min

 

Exhibition view: Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019. Hito Steyerl, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2019

 

Photo © Andrea FranzXaver Süß / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019

Empty Centre, 1998

16mm shown on video, sound

Duration: 62 min

 

Exhibition view: Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019. Hito Steyerl, Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2019

 

Photo © Andrea FranzXaver Süß / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2019

Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2019

Hito Steyerl
Akademie der Künste, Berlin
February 21 – April 14, 2019
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Hito Steyerl's artistic discourse orbits socio-political processes in theory and practice: post-colonial criticism, abuse of power, violence and the influences of globalisation on the financial, labour and goods markets are visualised in various media. The artist responds to the influence of the digital and the global that increasingly dominates everyday life by assembling and disassembling images, texts, performances, multimedia installations and essayistic documentaries. Together with other installations, Hell Yeah We Fuck Die, 2017 developed for the Skulptur Projekte in Münster, will make the natural, political and material dimension of images and audio-video sequences perceptible in the exhibition at Pariser Platz. Between steel barriers and walls reminiscent of crisis areas, films of humanoid robots address current questions about the role of computer technologies in war.

 

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