Hills and trays and...

Liam Gillick
January 17 – March 15, 2003

The Local Area Produces Lightbulbs, 2003 (back) 

Cut vinyl on wall
Dimensions variable

Diagrammatic Scenario For Literally No Place: Parts 1/3/5/7/9/11/13, 2003 (center)
Paper, glass pots
Installation dimensions variable, height 100 cm

A Platform, 2003 (front)

Powder-coated aluminium (RAL 2000 Yellow ORANGE), transparent Plexiglas, Plexiglas orange 478, Plexiglas yellow 303, Plexiglas blue 625
240 x 240 x 5 cm
 
Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Return to the Commune, 2003 (left)

Cut vinyl on wall
Height 340 cm, distance from ground 40 cm 

Reciprocal Platform, 2003 (center) 
Powder-coated aluminium, transparent Plexiglas
5 x 240 x 240 cm

A Frequented Place, 2003 (right)
Powder-coated aluminium (RAL 1018 Zinc Yellow), transparent Plexiglas; Plexiglas orange 478, Plexiglas yellow 303, Plexiglas blue 625
240 x 240 x 5 cm


Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Return to the Commune, 2003 (left)

Cut vinyl on wall
Height 340 cm, distance from ground 40 cm 

Reciprocal Platform, 2003 (center) 
Powder-coated aluminium, transparent Plexiglas
240 x 240 x 5 cm

A Frequented Place, 2003 (right)
Powder-coated aluminium (RAL 1018 Zinc Yellow), transparent Plexiglas, Plexiglas orange 478, Plexiglas yellow 303, Plexiglas blue 625
240 x 240 x 5 cm


Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

A Frequented Place, 2003 

Powder-coated aluminium (RAL 1018 Zinc Yellow), transparent Plexiglas, Plexiglas orange 478, Plexiglas yellow 303, Plexiglas blue 625
240 x 240 x 5 cm


Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Return to the Commune, 2003 (back)

Cut vinyl on wall
Height 340 cm, distance from ground 40 cm 

Reciprocal Platform, 2003 (front) 
Powder-coated aluminium, transparent Plexiglas
5 x 240 x 240 cm


Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

The Local Area Produces Lightbulbs, 2003 (back) 

Cut vinyl on wall

 

A Platform, 2003 (front) 
Powder-coated aluminium (RAL 2000 Yellow ORANGE), transparent Plexiglas, Plexiglas orange 478, Plexiglas yellow 303, Plexiglas blue 625
240 x 240 x 5 cm


Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Return to the Commune, 2003

Cut vinyl on wall
Height 340 cm, distance from ground 40 cm 

Photo © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Original exhibition invitation (recto) 

Hills and trays and...

Liam Gillick
January 17 – March 15, 2003
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This exhibition runs parallel to the exhibition ...and Punctutated Everydays, Gallery Max Hetzler, Holzmarktstraße, Berlin, January 17 to March 8 2003. 

The starting point of the two exhibitions in Berlin is Gillick's book Literally No Place, which was published on the occasion of the exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery in London in 2002. 

 

This book plays with the simultaneity of locations and leads to a doubling of scenarios and possible spaces. Among other things, it expresses the conditioning due to different environmental influences through the relationship of a boy with his cousin. The different origins in urban and rural environments lead to different moral attitudes. Images of interdependencies of thought, space, attitude and representation, topography and aesthetic attribution run through the entire book. 

 

Hills and Trays..., our part of the 'Doppelperspektivausstellung' (Double Perspective Exhibition), thus represents an attempt at a spatialization of thought patterns that can be characterized as interior space, as "interior perspective", whereas ...and punctuated Everydays (at Galerie Max Hetzler) characterizes the external perspective, an "exterior view". 

 

Our exhibition consists of three platforms, a 'Wallgraphic' and a 'Walltext', which is a quote from a passage in the book about the only factory in a rural area that never produces the same product twice. 

 

This parallel view began with different perspectives, but not only as a basic motif and logic of his view of things and scenarios in general, but concretely with his discrete contribution to two locations on the occasion of the Berlin Biennale 2001.

Starting from the attic in the Kunst-Werke Berlin, conceived as a social and discursive space, a topographically and thoughtfully anchored text took place from there to its end at the other exhibition venue of the Biennale, the Allianz building on the southern side of the Spree. 

 

Already his first Berlin exhibition at Schipper & Krome, 1996 Erasmus is late, played, at that time still in a room of the old gallery in Auguststraße 1996, with a juxtaposition of views, a didactic and a theroetic structure, which resulted from the figure game "Erasmus is late".

"I have to keep reminding people that my work is about the construction of ideologies in relation to the built world, it's not about illustrating fragments of the built world. Some of the things have a kind of art value which becomes much easier to read once you put it into the relativist space of corporate environment or a social environment, it becomes much more off-register, off-kilter."

— Liam Gillick, 2002

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