In Praise of Shadows

Martin Boyce
April 27 – June 23, 2012

Fall, 2012 (left) 
Jesmonite, steel
220 x 156 x 5 cm 

Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (center) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Still To Be Said, 2012 (right) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 


Photo © Jens Ziehe

Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (front) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Still To Be Said, 2012 (center) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

Fall, 2012 (back) 
Jesmonite, steel
220 x 156 x 5 cm 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Still To Be Said, 2012 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Still To Be Said, 2012 (detail) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Still To Be Said, 2012 (detail) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Still To Be Said, 2012 (detail) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

 
Photo © Jens Ziehe

Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (detail) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Photo © Jens Ziehe
Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (detail) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Photo © Jens Ziehe
Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (detail) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Fall, 2012 
Jesmonite, steel
220 x 156 x 5 cm 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Years And Stars And Storms, 2012 (left) 
Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components
28 x 24 x 24 cm approx. each, 5 parts
37 x 17 x 17 cm approx. each, 3 parts
Dimensions variable 

Still To Be Said
, 2012 (right) 
Wood, veneered MDF, galvanized steel, painted aluminium, brass, electrical components
145 x 300 x 125 cm 

 

Photo © Jens Ziehe

A Constellation (of fallen petals on a table top), 2012 (left) 

Jesmonite, steel, painted steel

156 x 220 x 5 cm

 

This Place Isn't Here Anymore, 2012 (center)

Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components

Dimensions variable

Absent Eyes, 2012 (right) 
Painted and rusted steel, brass
146 x 49 x 40 cm


Photo © Jens Ziehe

This Place Isn't Here Anymore, 2012 (left)

Steel chain, painted steel, electrical components

Dimensions variable

A Constellation (of fallen petals on a table top), 2012 (center) 

Jesmonite, steel, painted steel

156 x 220 x 5 cm

Absent Eyes, 2012 (detail) (right) 
Painted and rusted steel, brass
146 x 49 x 40 cm

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Absent Eyes, 2012 

Painted and rusted steel, brass
146 x 49 x 40 cm


Photo © Jens Ziehe

A Constellation (of fallen petals on a table top), 2012

Jesmonite, steel, painted steel

156 x 220 x 5 cm

Photo © Jens Ziehe

Exhibition view: Martin Boyce, In Praise of Shadows, Johnen Galerie, 2012


Photo © Jens Ziehe

In Praise of Shadows

Martin Boyce
Johnen Galerie, Berlin
April 27 – June 23, 2012
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In conjunction with Berlin Gallery Weekend Johnen Galerie is showing the exhibition In Praise of Shadows with new works by the 2011 Turner Prize winner Martin Boyce.

Boyce's works consist of the complex, visual language of historical design objects, which he places in relation to the present. His works resemble melancholic, visual poems, whose vocabulary stems from architecture and modernism. 

Modernism has become a scene of highly ambivalent experiences, so that Boyce's works always touch on the question to what the extent have their hopes and dreams been passed on over the ears, having to be adapted to reality. For several years the highly abstracted concrete trees, created by the brothers Joel and Jan Martel in 1925 for a garden in Paris, have been the starting point for Martin Boyce. They can be seen as a symbol of the submission of nature to design. Boyce uses the geometric structures on which the trees are based as a starting point for objects as diverse as letters, lamps, screens, masks, leaves, grids or furniture. He creates sculptures, installations and spaces, where nature and architecture collapse and evoke a melancholic mood of decay and abandonment. In the murals and on the surfaces of the various objects, fragments of the geometric structures of the trees are arranged, which in turn form letters that are composed over the surface and can be read as poetic lines of text. It is also thanks to this poetry that Boyce's art does not remain in cold exactness, but involves and deeply touches the viewer through countless variations and associations. 


Martin Boyce (*1967) lives and works in Glasgow, where he attended the Glasgow School of Art until 1990. Solo exhibitions of his works include Fruitmarket Gallery Edinburgh (1999), MMK Frankfurt (2002), Tramway Glasgow (2002), Adolf Luther Prize, Krefeld (2004), Centre d'Art Contemporain Geneva (2007), Scottish Pavilion at the Biennale di Venezia (2009) and Turner Prize exhibition, Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead (2011). 

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