Tell me about yesterday tomorrow

with Cemile Sahin
November 28, 2019 – October 18, 2020
"ich glaube reporterin cemile sahin war lange nicht in der türkei", 2017
Digital video
Duration: 6:24
 
Photo © NS-Dokumentationszentrum München
"ich glaube reporterin cemile sahin war lange nicht in der türkei", 2017
Digital video
Duration: 6:24
 
Photo © NS-Dokumentationszentrum München

Tell me about yesterday tomorrow

with Cemile Sahin
NS-Dokumentationszentrum M√ľnchen, Munich
November 28, 2019 – October 18, 2020
Previous
Next

“The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions that have been hidden by the answers.” (James Baldwin)

 

The exhibition titled Tell me about yesterday tomorrow opens up a dialogue between contemporary art and the remembrance work performed by the Munich Documentation Centre for the History of National Socialism. Works by over 40 international artists explore how to interpret the past and its links to the present day against the background of the historical exhibition. These works, most of them new, invite viewers to consider global realities of life while supplementing German History with international perspectives and creating polyphonic narratives of the past and future. Through the media of painting, photography, installation, video, and performance, artists from different generations, from the Nazi period to the present day, convey many-sided images of history, recounting individual experiences while also highlighting structural connections. The exhibition features selected works of art from the Nazi period and recent decades alongside new works created specifically for this context. 

 

Historian John Henrik Clarke observed how important history is to our present and future: “History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is also a compass that people use to find themselves on the map of human geography. History tells a people where they have been and what they have been, where they are, and what they are. Most important, history tells people where they still must go, what they still must be.” (John Henrik Clarke, 1996)

 

 

Read more

Search