ARCO Madrid

ARCO Madrid

February 24 – March 2, 2020

Launching to coincide with ARCO Madrid 2020, Esther Schipper is pleased to present highlights of the works that will be on view at the fair.

 

Among the artists represented here are: Martin Boyce, Matti Braun, Nathan Carter, Simon Fujiwara, General Idea, Ann Veronica Janssens, Florin Mitroi, Roman Ondak, Philippe Parreno, Ugo Rondinone, Anri Sala, and Tomás Saraceno.

 

 ARCO Madrid’s new thematic section, entitled It’s Just a Matter of Time, revolves around the work of Félix González-Torres and the scope of his influence on contemporary art and speech. For the launch of this new section, we present Liam Gillick’s historical floor piece Half Asleep, Half Awake, 1998: golden and silver glitter dissolved in pure alcohol with which the floor is swept.

  • Martin Boyce

    Untitled, 2018

    Jesmonite, painted steel, painted wood, glass, plywood

    190 x 135 x 4 cm

  • Martin Boyce (b. 1967) has reworked and reformulated iconic design objects, developing his own pictorial language based on a reading of the formal and conceptual histories of design, architecture and urban planning.

     

    The work brings together Boyce’s signature motif, drawing on Jan and Joel Martel’s concrete trees constructed for the Robert Mallet-Stevens’ Pavilion of Transport at the Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris in 1925, with Jesmonite, one of the key materials that recur in the artist’s work.

     

    Several frames of different sizes, some partially filled with glass, lattice metal material, or painted wood, appear nestled together in a constellation that recalls the shapes of the concrete trees but also suggests movement as if the white frames were creating a vortex leading into the center of the panel’s opening.

  • Exhibition view: Martin Boyce, The Light Pours Out, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
    Exhibition view: Martin Boyce, The Light Pours Out, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Matti Braun

    Ohne Titel, 1996/97

    Glass reinforced plastic (GRP), polyester, white
    Seat height 75 cm, ø 45 cm

  • The practice of Matti Braun (b. 1968) investigates the unexpected, often little known effects of cross-cultural dynamics, making visible patterns of artistic migrations and cultural misrecognition.

     

    These light beige fiberglass sculptures are both objects and functional stools. Their rounded shape is reminiscent of a distorted drop of liquid or a blob of dough or putty, while suggesting softness, which the hardness of the fiberglass however negates. At the same time, it has a smooth and shiny surface. Works in the series are all different: some are round, others appear to have been flattened as if someone had sat on them or formed bread pellets.

     

    Matti Brau's recent silk paintings and glass works are currently on view at Esther Schipper, Berlin.

  • Exhibition view: Matti Braun, Ku Lak, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2020. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
    Exhibition view: Matti Braun, Ku Lak, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2020. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Nathan Carter

    Anther Anemone Annihilator, 2019

    Paper and foil collage

    76,2 x 94 cm

  • Nathan Carter’s (b. 1970) exuberant new collages continue his recent theme of playfully mixing abstract and organic shapes to create fantastic botanical compositions, named for flowers and vaguely resembling their distinct shapes.

     

    Made from golden foil and colored paper, the collages focus on flowers in the process of blossoming. Thus among the tightly intertwined forms reminiscent of leaves and vines, are also stamen and stigma, evoking the complex reproductive apparatus of plants.

  • Emphasizing the fantastic element of these idiosyncratic constructions, which can also include hearts or a row of rainbow spikes, the artist identified the sharp points as “visible deadly warnings to all away-supporters and dream killers.”

  • Simon Fujiwara

    Untitled (Superstructure), 2020

    Polycarbonate and cardboard
    33 x 100 x 70 cm (13 x 39 3/8 x 27 1/2 in)
    Plinth: 90 x 54 x 75 cm (35 3/8 x 21 1/4 x 29 1/2 in)
    Edition of 3

  • Over the past decade, Simon Fujiwara (b. 1982) has become known for his staging of large, complex exhibitions that explore the deeply rooted mechanisms of identity construction for both individuals and societies.

     

    The work is part of Simon Fuijwara’s body of work taking its inspiration from a “build your own” model kit of the Anne Frank House which the artist bought in the museum gift shop in Amsterdam. In 2018, Fujiwara’s major solo exhibition at the Kunsthaus Bregenz, entitled Hope House, featured a full-scale replica of the Anne Frank House reconstructed within the museum.


  • Untitled (Superstructure)
     constructs an architectural extension around the side of the model which recognizably refers to the work of Iraqi-British star architect Zaha Hadid, who became internationally known for the fluid, organic shapes of her buildings. The curved shapes of Hadid’s signature formal language have become associated with museums and cultural production, symbolizing a certain notion of the public: an institution that is itself a public space, a spectacle, and a museum.

     

    In this context the juxtaposition highlights the dynamics of contemporary cultural institutions: with its “build your own” model, the Anne Frank museum is creating merchandising that doubles as political tool, while the extension creates an analogy to other museums and their participation in corporate culture.

  • Exhibition view: Hope House Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
    Exhibition view: Hope House Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • General Idea

    Great AIDS (Cadmium Red Medium), 1990/2019

    Acrylic on linen

    300 x 300 cm

  • Throughout its 25-year-long career, prominent Canadian artists’ group General Idea—formed in 1969 by AA Bronson (b. Michael Tims, 1946), Felix Partz (b. Ronald Gabe, 1945-1994) and Jorge Zontal (b. Slobodan Saia-Levi, 1944-1994)—produced an important body of work in various media and formats, which continues to be a reference point for generations of artists around the world.

     

    Great AIDS (Cadmium Red Medium) is part of a new series of AIDS paintings conceived by the group in 1990, but only executed by AA Bronson in 2019, 25 years after the death of Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal from AIDS-related causes.

     

    The AIDS logo appears mirrored along the canvas’s horizontal and vertical axes. The work consists of 4 canvases, exhibited together as a one square painting.

  • In response to an invitation to create works for the Art against AIDS benefit in 1987, General Idea appropriated the colors and stacked letter design of Robert Indiana’s widely quoted LOVE (1965), re-configuring it to read “AIDS.”

     

    Producing posters, wallpaper, stamps, public sculpture, and billboards, General Idea spread their AIDS logo throughout art institutions and transportation systems in the United States and Europe, as well as in galleries, with the now-iconic series of AIDS paintings and wallpapers.

     

    As AA Bronson explained at the time: “We want to make the word AIDS normal... By keeping the word visible, it has a normalizing effect that will hopefully play a part in normalizing people’s relationship to the disease—to make it something that can be dealt with as a disease rather than a set of moral or ethical issues.

  • Exhibition view: General Idea, Tiempo Partido, MALBA, Buenos Aires. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Ann Veronica Janssens

    CL2 Blue Shadow, CL9 Pink Shadow, Sunset B, 2018

    Annealed glass, PVC filter
    230 x 115 x 1,2 cm each, 3 parts
    Edition of 1

  • Ann Veronica Janssens’ (b. 1956) work foregrounds the body’s perception of the world and itself in it. She often uses light, natural optical phenomena or glass as medium. Produced with great care, her works exude the impression of great simplicity yet create vivid experiences of the act of seeing, evoking a heightened awareness of the changeability and fleetingness of individual perceptions.

     

    This triptych consists of three glass panels, each made of two layers of vertically ribbed annealed glass that encompass a combination of colored PVC filters. The association of the glass pattern with the colored filter creates iridescent effects and deep changing colors.

  • As one moves around the work, the ribbed surface reflects the light at different angles, creating extreme variations in colors. For instance, a panel can appear green if seen frontally, and dark blue if seen from the side.

     

    The work belongs to Ann Veronica Janssens’s ongoing series of “gaufrettes” which highlights the pictorial materiality and spatiality of color. 

     

    Works in the series are currently on view in Hot Pink Turquoise, Ann Veronica Janssens' major survey exhibition at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebæk, Denmark.

  • Exhibition view: Ann Veronica Janssens, Hot Pink Turquoise, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, 2020. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020. Photo © Kim Hansen.
    Exhibition view: Ann Veronica Janssens, Hot Pink Turquoise, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, 2020. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020. Photo © Kim Hansen.
  • Florin Mitroi

    8.8.992, 1992 Tempera on canvas
    Tempera auf Leinwand
    81 x 64,7 cm (31 7/8 x 25 1/4 in) (unframed)
    83,5 x 67,2 x 3,8 cm (32 5/8 x 26 3/8 x 1 1/8 in) (framed)
    81 x 64,7 cm (ungerahmt)
    83,5 x 67,2 x 3,8 cm (gerahmt)
  • Florin Mitroi's oeuvre is predominantly characterized by series of stylized portraits, usually renditions of head and torso, depicting individuals with strong black brush strokes in rigid positions. Other aspects of his work comprise ink drawings on paper—mostly nude studies with a mythological underline—as well as symbolic and figurative zinc plates produced in the last years of his life.

     

    Florin Mitroi (1938–2002) is an intriguing figure in the Romanian art scene. He was a passionate teacher—he taught at “Nicolae Grigorescu” Institute of Fine Arts in Bucharest for more than 30 years—but a reserved individual. His role in the arts school was well known by the local scene, but few knew his art too—he had only one solo exhibition during his lifetime, in 1993 in Bucharest. Only after his death and the discovery of numerous works in his studio, did his prolific production became apparent, with more than 8,000 graphic works, drawings, engravings, paintings, and carved objects in metal.

  • Exhibition view: Studiosaurus Ferox. Florin Mitroi, Works of Art 1974–2002, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
    Exhibition view: Studiosaurus Ferox. Florin Mitroi, Works of Art 1974–2002, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Roman Ondak

    If, 2019

    Ink on found old print
    23,5 x 36,5 cm (unframed)
    48,2 x 60,2 x 4 cm (framed)

  • Roman Ondak’s (b.1966) work evolves from a performative conception and consists of sculpture, installation, photography, drawing and performance. The artist often uses found objects. His medium is the everyday and society’s sets of expectations, assumptions, automatisms and projections that shape our perception of reality.

     

    Created on the occasion of the artist's first solo exhibition with the gallery, the work depicts a view of Paris with the Cathedral of Notre Dame. In a reference to the fire of the Parisian landmark in April 2019, bright red clouds rise from the church’s towers and fill the sky. Yet, it is not a characteristic flame or fire cloud that the artist has painted. Rather the color extends upwards and fills the sky in an abstracted T-shape.

  • Exhibition view: Roman Ondak, Perfect Society, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
    Exhibition view: Roman Ondak, Perfect Society, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Philippe Parreno

    Flickering Lights (Marianne Brandt), 2018

    Stereolithography print with translucent resin, halogen light bulb, DMX dimmer, light programming
    85 x 64 x 40 cm

    Edition of 50 unique variations

  • Philippe Parreno (b. 1964) radically redefines the exhibition experience by taking it as a medium, placing its construction at the heart of his process.

     

    Flickering Lights (Marianne Brandt) consists of a 3D print copy of the Gropius Bau’s lamp created by German designer Marianne Brandt (1893-1983) in 1926. The work is a new iteration of Philippe Parreno’s iconic light installation, Flickering Lights, and was created on occasion of the artist’s first major solo exhibition in Germany at Gropius Bau, Berlin.

  • Wallpaper Marilyn was conceived by Philippe Parreno on occasion of his major solo exhibition at the Gropius Bau in Berlin. The wallpaper depicts irises, printed with phosphorescent ink on paper. The pattern was previously seen as a background element in the set of the artist’s 2012 film Marilyn, which conjures up the presence of Marilyn Monroe in the set of a suite at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, where the actress lived in the 1950s.

  • Exhibition view: Philippe Parreno, Gropius Bau, Berlin, 2018. Photo © Andrea Rossetti.
  • Ugo Rondinone’s (b.1964) work refers concurrently to the natural world, romanticism and existentialism, encapsulating a “mental trinity” that has underpinned his art for thirty years.

     

    Pulsating with brilliant color, Ugo Rondinone's sun paintings comprise one of the artist’s most celebrated and longstanding series of works. Executed with acrylic spray-paint on an entirely round canvas, each sun painting, as the artist describes them, consists of several bands of hazy color, as though they are emanating from the center of a circle.

     

    Each vivid shade is airbrushed into the next, which helps to create the illusion that the work is moving with a hypnotic rhythm and that the canvas is receding into a concave shape.

  • the precise is part of a body of work initiated by Ugo Rondinone in 2013 with Human Nature: nine monumental sculptures installed on the Rockefeller Plaza in New York, as part of the Public Art Fund project. In a further development, the artist created smaller iterations of the same motif, inscribing this body of work in an ancestral sculptural tradition that includes Palaeolithic Venus representations, Cycladic marble figurines, Stonehenge, or the Inukshuk stone cairns built by the Inuit in Canada.

     

    The stone figure is the most archetypal representation of the human form; an elemental symbol of the human spirit, connected to the earth yet mythic in the imagination. The image of the figure belongs to nobody, is timeless, and universal.

    —Ugo Rondinone

  • Exhibition view: Lustwarande 15 — Rapture & Pain, Park De Oude Warande, Tilburg, 2015. Photo © GJ van Rooij
  • Anri Sala

    Untitled (Gymnothorax Afer/Cuba), 2018

    Ink on paper, historical manuscript page with hand-colored etching on paper

    27,5 x 41,9 cm (10 5/8 x 16 1/8 in); 32 x 47,7 cm (12 5/8 x 18 1/2 in) (unframed, 2 parts)

    39 x 55,6 x 3,5 cm (15 3/8 x 21 5/8 x 1 1/8 in); 45,8 x 61,2 x 3,5 cm (17 3/4 x 24 1/8 x 1 1/8 in) (framed, 2 parts)

  • The oeuvre of Anri Sala (b. 1974) explores the relationships between music and narrative, architecture and film, interleaving qualities of different media in both complex and intuitive ways to produce works in which one medium takes on the qualities of another.

     

    This work takes as reference image an engraving of an eel. Sala has taken the island of Cuba and placed it on the page in approximate likeness to the engraving with which the drawing is paired. Although the shape of the individual islands and those of the fish bear no exact relation, a striking formal similarity of form and color manifests itself.

  • In this series Untitled (map/species), Sala reworks maps of countries and geopolitical territories through manual manipulation, skewing and warping representations of land mass so that they fit within the boundaries of the found etchings of biological species with which they are exhibited.

     

    As the notion of the frame helped classify and simultaneously seek to constrain their subjects in etchings of the 18th century, the margins of Sala’s map/ species series restrict the geographical representations that they house.

  • Exhibition view: Anri Sala, Le Temps coudé, MUDAM, Luxembourg, 2019. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020. Photo © Rémi Villaggi
    Exhibition view: Anri Sala, Le Temps coudé, MUDAM, Luxembourg, 2019. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020. Photo © Rémi Villaggi
  • Tomás Saraceno

    GP Com b/M+M, 2019

    Stainless steel, mirror panels, polyester rope, fishing line, metal wire

    104 x 149 x 132 cm (41 x 58 5/8 x 52 in), 6 modules, ø 60 cm (23 5/8 in) each, Mirror Cloud

  • Tomás Saraceno (b. 1973) is renowned for his visionary projects that envision a future airborne life, inspired by the morphology of soap bubbles, spider webs, cellular structures and astronomical diagrams.

     

    The sculpture is assembled from six large modular interlocking elements. A metal frame defines each plane of the geometric shape. Some of the sides have mirror sheets inserted flush with the frame, others are left empty. These partially open forms allow the viewer to look through the shapes, and see their interior structure; some show internal webs of string that appear to hold the planes in place, in a way visualizing the physical forces exerting pressure.

  • The sculpture refers to Tomás Saraceno’s larger ongoing project Cloud Cities in which the artist explores the possibilities of future autonomous and sustainable environments, architecture and urbanism. Saraceno seeks to propose utopian visions of cities, settlements and gardens, floating in the air and relying only on the energy of natural sources. His visions are informed by the interdisciplinary research that he carries out together with his studio—a series of forays into material science, biology, astrophysics, engineering and atmospheric studies.

     

    Palazzo Strozzi in Florence has just opened a large-scale survey exhibition of the artist. Titled Aria, the exhibition is on view through July 19, 2020.

  • Liam Gillick – It's Just a Matter of Time at ARCO Madrid

    Liam Gillick – It's Just a Matter of Time at ARCO Madrid

    Half Asleep, Half Awake, 1998

    Golden and silver glitter, 0,5 litres pure alcohol

    Dimensions variable

  • ARCO Madrid’s new thematic section, entitled It’s Just a Matter of Time, revolves around the work of Félix González-Torres and the scope of his influence on contemporary art and speech.

     

    For the launch of this new section, we present Liam Gillick’s historical floor piece Half Asleep, Half Awake, 1998: golden and silver glitter dissolved in pure alcohol with which the floor is swept. This process leaves clearly visible residues. Whenever found necessary, the process can be repeated.

     

    Since 1996, glitter has been a recurring motif in Liam Gillick’s work. The connotations with which the inclusion of the material (often mixed with alcohol and spread across the surface of a table or the floor) is imbued have included both festivity, renovation, cycles of crisis, exposure to the apparently menial, or period-specific fascination with its aesthetics.

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