• The Reading Corner: Liu Ye

    The Reading Corner: Liu Ye

    "It is no accident that the simplified paintings by Liu Ye are reminiscent of cartoons and illustrations in children’s books: the artist’s father wrote books for children and possessed a box filled with Western, often prohibited classic children’s literature. The pictures in them influenced Liu Ye at an early age. After studying at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and the Berlin University of the Arts, the artist discovered his own distinct style, which plays with viewers’ visual expectations and catches them unawares with surprising pictorial compositions. His small-format paintings of Miffy the rabbit, the character created by Dick Bruna, are unmistakable, often painted against a dismal background that recalls the Old Masters or combined with elements borrowed from Piet Mondrian, as are his pastel compositions with innocent yet challenging female characters."⁠⠀
    ⁠⠀
    This first catalogue raisonné featuring the sensitive works by Liu Ye provides an overview of his creative output from 1991 to 2015. ⁠

     

    Available here!

  • Film Screening – Anri Sala, Long Sorrow (2005) & Answer Me (2008)

    www.scharaun.de
    Film Screening – Anri Sala, Long Sorrow (2005) & Answer Me (2008)

    Anri Sala, Answer Me, 2008, HD Video, color, stereo, duration 4:50 min
    © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020
    Film still © Anri Sala

     

    Programm #1:

    Anri Sala

    Long Sorrow (2005) & Answer Me (2008)

     

    Friday 29. May, 2020, for one week

    From 6 pm

     

    Click here to watch

  • Letter from Berlin – May 22, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – May 22, 2020

    Ari Benjamin Meyers, Four Liverpool Musicians (Bette, Budgie, Ken, Louisa), 2018, three channel video, color, sound, four original scores, framed, duration 52:10 mins, scores: 4 framed score triptychs, 3 score pages each (30,1 x 23,2 cm each score page, 49,5 x 95,3 x 2,3 cm each framed triptych)
    Film still © Ari Benjamin Meyers

     

    This week we take the launch of our Ari Benjamin Meyers Online Viewing Room as occasion to loosely focus on music in this Letter from Berlin.

    We introduce Meyers’ with a film streaming of his 2018 Four Liverpool Musicians and a text by Alexander Abdelilah. You can also find Meyers recent talk with Michael Langer in German public radio linked. (Please note these weekly viewing links are temporary: The film is available to view only through Sunday night, Berlin time.)

    In a recent conversation with the Vienna-based curator Alexandra Grimmer, Liu Ye spoke about listening to music in his studio.

    Ryan Gander
     has practiced his DJ-ing skills. See, and listen to, his broadcast, recorded on his birthday.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

     

    Hier finden Sie die deutsche Version unseres Briefes aus Berlin

  • Messages from Home – Francesco Gennari

    Messages from Home – Francesco Gennari

    Photo © Francesco Gennari, 15 aprile 2020⁠

     

    VIAGGI DA CAMERA is the new online project from the Fondazione Nicola Trussardi. "Viaggi da camera" collects and distributes daily images, videos and texts, chosen by artists invited to tell their home and private space. Every day a new contribution will be published on the Foundation's website and social channels.⁠

    Inspired by Xavier de Maistre's famous 18th century novel "Journey around my room" - written during a 42-day obligatory stay in a room in Turin - "Viaggi da camera" invites artists to open the doors of their real and imaginary rooms. Taken from day #39, Francesco Gennari shared a glimpse into his home life in the midst of lockdown.⁠

  • Letter from Berlin – May 16, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – May 16, 2020

    Pierre Huyghe, A Way in Untilled, 2012, HD Video in color, sound, duration: 14 min
    © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020. Film still © Pierre Huyghe

     

    This week we continue our film streaming with Tao Hui’s Mongolism from 2010. (Please note these weekly viewing links are temporary: The film is available to view only through Sunday night, Berlin time.)

    As Spring turns into Summer, in this Letter from Berlin Isabelle Moffat presents two outdoor projects: Martin Boyce’s 2019 commission at Mount Stuart on the Isle of Bute and Pierre Huyghe’s La Saison des Fêtes from 2010, including an exclusive screening of Huyghe's film on his Documenta project, A Way in Untilled!

    In four short videos, Isa Melsheimer speaks about her transformative experience on the coast of Newfoundland.

    This week’s theme was loosely inspired by Para Site’s large-scale group exhibition entitled Garden of Six Seasons that includes Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster’s work Gloria. More information below.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

     

    Hier finden Sie die deutsche Version unseres Briefes aus Berlin!

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.4

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.4

    Welcome to the next instalment of the series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track:

     

    ⁠⁠1. Has been with the gallery for over 30 years
    ⁠2. The sky's the limit⁠
    3. Loves rules
    ⁠4. Enjoys heavy metal⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

    Journey Through the Gallery – Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms

    Exhibition view: Tomás Saraceno, Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2019⁠
    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In this next instalment of Journey Through the Gallery, we look back to November 2019 where we presented Algo-r(h)i(y)thms, Tomás Saraceno's third solo exhibition with the gallery. ⁠

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • The Reading Corner: Anri Sala

    The Reading Corner: Anri Sala

    Photo © Mousse Publishing

     

    This book, published for the exhibition Anri Sala. Le Temps coudé, presented at Mudam in fall 2019, comprises four essays by the philosopher and musicologist Peter Szendy that consider the artist’s major works since 2013.

     

    Demonstrating the strong intellectual connections that has developed between the two over the course of their collaborations, these essays draw on a sensory experience of the works of Anri Sala to analyze the way that music nourishes them, in their connection to image, space, history, and time.⁠

     

    Available here! 

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, Slow Graffiti

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone,  Slow Graffiti

    Ugo Rondinone, If there were anywhere but desert, Monday, 2000, fiberglass, paint, clothing, glitter, 86 x 76 x 122 cm. Photo © Studio Rondinone

     

    Ugo Rondinone's 2001 exhibition Slow Graffiti consisted of two new works. The exhibition space was dominated by a tessellated mirror partition (5 x 5 meters) which is positioned in a way to reflect the whole room in fragments, or rather to display a distorted picture of the room in which the sculpture, a clown figure made of polyester, leans passively against the wall.

    Integrated into the partition there were four loudspeakers playing a dialogue typical of Rondinone. To be heard is a woman's voice from the left and a man's voice from the right channel. The Beckett-like one-minute dialogue of the two voices talking at cross-purposes, fitted together to make a loop, expresses a depressing purposelessness, regarding content as well as formal aspects.

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Letter from Berlin – May 7, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – May 7, 2020

    David Claerbout, Die reine Notwendigkeit/The Pure Necessity, 2016. Color animation, duration 50:00 min.
    (This director's cut is 30 minutes long.)

     

    This week we continue our weekly film streaming with David Claerbout’s Die Reine Notwendigkeit / The Pure Necessity and also highlight the artist’s recent interviews and lectures. The film is available to view through Sunday night, Berlin time.

    This Letter from Berlin introduces three recent projects across magazines and the internet: Thomas Demand’s covers for the Italian architecture magazine Domus, Anri Sala’s contribution to M, the magazine of Le Monde, and the enthusiastically received "polite hack" of the website of this year’s Copenhagen Architecture Festival.

    We also want to draw your attention to an online screening of a work by Hito Steyerl, the Guggenheim Museum’s offer of virtual backgrounds and our new German language Online Viewing Room for Angela Bulloch.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

     

    Hier finden Sie die deutsche Version unseres Briefes aus Berlin!

  • Isa Melsheimer About the Whale Hearts at KINDL

    Isa Melsheimer About the Whale Hearts at KINDL

    We are very happy to announce that Isa Melsheimer's exhibition at KINDL, Berlin, is re-opening today!⁠

    In this clip, Isa Melsheimer speaks about about the whale hearts on currently on view at KINDL, a motif which refers to Melsheimer's artist residency on Fogo Island Arts, a popular whale-watching location in Newfoundland.⁠

    Click here to watch the full video!⁠

  • Messages from Home – A Recipe from Tao Hui

    Messages from Home – A Recipe from Tao Hui

    Under the heading Messages from Home artists are sharing videos from their (temporary) studios or homes.⁠

     

    Here, Tao Hui shares a recipe of his take on a Chinese-style ice plant salad!

     

    See the full recipe here!

  • The Reading Corner with Ryan Gander

    The Reading Corner with Ryan Gander

    In this week’s Reading Corner, Ryan Gander reads I Am for an Art by Claes Oldenburg (1961) to his two daughters, Penny and Olive.

     

    Click here to watch the full reading

  • Letter from Berlin – April 30,2020

    Letter from Berlin – April 30,2020

    Roman Ondak, Lucky Day, 2006, 16 mm Film, color, silent, duration 04:00 min (loop)

     

    This week we focus on film in our Letter from Berlin. As this is a holiday weekend in Germany, we have assembled a program that adopts the format of a magazine. We hope you enjoy browsing its sections. The films are available to stream through Sunday night, Berlin time.

     

    In a postscript to last week’s book-themed edition, Etienne Chambaud introduces another format of films on books: the film on a book about a film.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here 

     

    Hier finden Sie die deutsche Version unseres Briefes aus Berlin!

  • Studio Visit with David Claerbout

    Studio Visit with David Claerbout

    “I’ve always thought that one of the privileges that an artist has is to have time to waste.”

     

    Louisiana Channel visited David Claerbout in his studio in Antwerp, Belgium, where he spoke about some of his intriguing projects – from creating a 360-degree journey around a room with Elvis Presley, to a completely different take on a classic animated Disney film.

     

    Claerbout works with what he describes as “virtual image making.” Early on, he knew that his work would be a sort of resistance against information in images as well as a fight between “clock-time” and the plurality of duration: “Which is frightening in a way because it means that you no longer can define a space of time.”

     

    Watch the full video here

  • Matti Braun – A Video and a Reading

    Matti Braun – A Video and a Reading

    A video of the publication edited by Bodhisattva Chattopadhyay, Beth Citron, and Matti Braun with a reading by Joëlle Bargel of an excerpt from the biographical essay Traveling in a Time Machine to the Golden Age of Science Fiction in Kolkata (1963 - 1985) by Ranen Ghosh with additions by Santu Bag.

     

    Ranen Ghosh was a Bengali writer, editor and publisher from India. In 1963 he began writing science fiction (or kalpavigyan as the genre is known in Bengali) for the first Bengali science fiction magazine Aschorjo, working with his mentor Adrish Bardhan. After Aschorjo ceased publication, Ghosh edited the short-lived Bismay science fiction magazine with Sujit Dhar and Amitananda Das. After Bismay, Ghosh acted as a co-editor for Adrish Bardhan’s SF magazine Fantastic. Beside kalpavigyan, Ghosh was also an admirer of popular science. He passed away in Kolkata on April 7th, 2019.

     

    The book brings together texts by Parashuram, Beth Citron, Bodhisattva Chattopadhyay, Dip Ghosh, Ranen Ghosh, Soham Guha, Sudhir Kakar, Sami Ahmad Khan, Matthia Löbke, Amrita Shah and presents Matti Braun’s artistic production of the last ten years.


    Designed by Yvonne Quirmbach, Berlin. Published by Kunstverein Heilbronn and Snoeck, 2020

     

    Watch the full video here

  • Letter from Berlin – April 24, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – April 24, 2020

    Krishtalka Books at the Esther Schipper Bookstore. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

     

    The gallery has re-opened and we have extended Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s exhibition Fog Dog. We look forward to welcoming you at the gallery again soon! 

    This week everything turns around books in our Letter from Berlin. Our bookstore, opened in 2018 with an overview of the publications of General Idea and AA Bronson, has seen a number of very special artist projects and has also become a site for readings and book launches. As its function as meeting place is on hold for now, we highlight past projects and focus on our artists’ relationship to books. 

    Matti Braun presents a virtual reading, in image and sound. Our Head of Content Isabelle Moffat takes his video as starting point to write about a new type of looking at books. And Gabriel Kurispeaks about his particular fondness for the conception and design of his own books and catalogues.

    We present a number of outstanding recent publications and end with the round-up of this week’s social media contributions from our artists. 

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

  • The Reading Corner with Gabriel Kuri pt.2

    The Reading Corner with Gabriel Kuri pt.2

    Gabriel Kuri, Reduce to Improper Fraction, 2018. 32 x 24 cm. Published by Three Star Books, Paris

     

    "I love books. By making my own, I learned that they do not have to be second to nor a derivative of my sculptural practice. Whether they are linked to a body or period of work, or exist completely independently, I always make an effort for them to have a life of their own. Books are material memory and register, key concepts in my understanding of what art is and what art can do. Books allow me to see my work as a collection of images. Images as pieces of evidence, metaphors, or signs, or simply—but no less importantly—as an essay of colour. I can see my practice through the narrative resulted from turning pages, which is quite different to pacing around a space.⁠

    Books have clear boundaries of size, format, material and binding that I always find helpful rather than limiting. I like to look at my practice through the limited structure of a book format. This shift of mind frame and optics is always helpful and never constraining. After the visible choices of colour, paper and layout in a few of my books, I guess one can see an inclination towards an aesthetics that embraces ordering and didactic principles. Making books is methodical, like my work. The methodology, the technique and of course the teamwork they involve, give me great pleasure, topped by the always welcome sense of surprise of finally holding the embodiment of an idea. I love it that books are mostly consumed intimately. And of course, I love paper." – Gabriel Kuri

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 1830

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 1830

    Exhibition view: Ugo Rondinone, two men contemplating the moon 183, Esther Schipper, Berlin⁠⠀
    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In 2016, Esther Schipper presented two men contemplating the moon 1830, Ugo Rondinone’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery. 

     

    Taken from a painting by Caspar David Friedrich, the exhibition’s title makes manifest Rondinone’s long-standing indebtedness both to the iconography and philosophy of German Romanticism. “The German Romantic movement was the first to blur the line between reality and illusion. In this sense I’m very attached to the idea of art and art making as an environment that is itself outside of time and inaccessible to a linear logic.“ (The Brooklyn Rail, 2013).

     

    Rondinone modified the exhibition space to create a self-contained environment: new walls cover the existing windows. The works themselves index architectural barriers between outside and inside—a monumental new series of aluminum-cast windows, a large-scale brick-wall painting and a new series of concrete sculptures cast from the corners of urban buildings—collectively comprising the space of an inner world. 

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.3

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.3

    Welcome to the next instalment of the series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

     

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track: 

     

    - mollusks galore

    - lock up your wedges

    - everything’s sorted

    - no Marie Kondo

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Messages from Home – Tao Hui

    Messages from Home – Tao Hui

    Under the heading Messages from Home artists are sharing videos from their (temporary) studios or homes.

     

    Here, Tao Hui shares snapshots of his life from his hometown, Yunyang, Chongqing, as well as his journey back to Beijing.

  • Online Concert & Interview – New Order with Liam Gillick

    Friday April 17, 2020, 7:30 pm
    Online Concert & Interview – New Order with Liam Gillick

    New Order’s collaboration with artist Liam Gillick was the hottest ticket at MIF17 and one of the most in-demand shows in Festival history. Now, the Manchester International Festival are given you a chance to relive this MIF classic at 7.30pm (UK) on Friday 17 April!⁠

    At MIF17, New Order took over Stage 1 of the iconic Old Granada Studios for a limited series of intimate shows created in collaboration with visual artist Liam Gillick and composer-arranger Joe Duddell.⁠

    Join from the comfort of your sofas for this one-night-only revival of the original live stream from the event which begins with a conversation between Dave Haslam and Liam Gillick and then joins the performance for the second half of the show. Broadcast exclusively through MIF Live on Friday 17 April.⁠

     

    Following immediately the concert Liam will be live in conversation with Peter Saville at 8:15 pm (UK).

     

    Tune in here

  • Letter from Berlin – April 17, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – April 17, 2020

    Exhibition view: Angela Bulloch, Heavy Metal Body, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2017. Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    First off, we are very happy to announce that we plan to open our exhibition space middle of next week - pending the clarification of local governmental regulations. 

    This week’s letter focuses on new additions and long collaborations: we introduce Etienne Chambaud whose representation was announced this week and highlight Angela Bulloch’s thirty-year history with the gallery. Below you find excerpts from her interview with Suzanne Cotter and from an essay by Alexander Provan, as well as a dedicated Online Viewing Room detailing her exhibitions with Esther Schipper since 1989. 

    We continue our collaboration with Zapp Magazine which is making available rare footage from the landmark group exhibition in which Angela Bulloch and many more of the gallery's artists participated: Traffic, curated by Nicolas Bourriaud at the CAPC Musée d’Art Contemporain, Bordeaux in 1996. 

    The theme continues as we present Jac Leirner’s recent work and Ugo Rondinone’s 2013 gallery exhibition from our social media posts.

    This week we have two recommendations: Don’t miss Liam Gillick’s conversation with Peter Saville on occasion of the Manchester International Festival’s streaming of ∑(No,12K,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So It Goes.

    And on Sunday Ari Benjamin Meyers is featured on German Public Radio.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

  • A Conversation with Ari Benjamin Meyers

    Sunday April 19, 2020, 1:30 pm
    A Conversation with Ari Benjamin Meyers

    Photo © Michael Chiu

     

    On Sunday April 19 at 1.30 pm Ari Benjamin Meyers will be the guest of the two-hour program Zwischentöne on Deutschlandfunk, German Public Radio. Hosted by Michael Langer, conversation alternates with musical works specially chosen by Meyers.⁠

    Tune in this Sunday April 19, 2020 at 1:30 pm!⁠

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, primal

    Journey Through the Gallery – Ugo Rondinone, primal

    Exhibition view: Ugo Rondinone, primal, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2013

    Photo © Andrea Rossetti

     

    In the next instalment of our team's favorite exhibitions from the history of the gallery, Tara K.Reddi, Senior Sales Director, shares why Ugo Rondinone’s 2013 exhibition primal stands out for her:

     

    "In 2013 for the exhibition of Ugo Rondinone’s primal the gallery space which was then at Schoeneberger Ufer became the stage for a series of new sculptures by Ugo Rondinone: 34 cast bronze horses, each individual in their form and size. The space was transformed with the installation of plywood flooring spread across the rooms of the gallery, uniting the space and introducing an active natural element into the white-cube environment. The white washed windows diffused the daylight and isolated the exhibition from the world outside. Suspended translucent discs of stained-glass clocks hung over the window panes. These colored, perfectly divided stained glass clock-faces, stripped of their hands, augmented the impression of an isolated environment, arrested in time and space.⁠

     

    The gallery, appeared to be transformed into a time capsule, occupied by small cast bronze horses not more than 20 cm in height, each of them spread across the wood flooring and each facing in a different direction. Each horse was modelled in clay by the artist and then cast in bronze leaving the surface raw and unfinished after the casting. Both the uniqueness and the rough, hand-made character of the sculptures are emphasized by the titles given to each of the works, introducing a romantic undertone to the exhibition. The horses “names” rather than “titles”, refer to primordial natural phenomena: the lava, the cosmos, the foliage, the sunrise etc."⁠⠀

     

    See inside the exhibition here.

  • Online Conference with Julia Scher

    Friday April 17, 2020, 4 pm
    Online Conference with Julia Scher

    How to use the virus-induced situation to build up momentum for social-ecological transformation?

     

    This conference, which includes participation from Julia Scher, is for generating an overview, and for creating threads of action and next steps. At the end of the conference, we can decide to do a follow-up conference and/or make it an evolving conference series. The participants can set up groups, which continue to work on specific issues. The follow-up conference would weave together all the threads again. And so forth. Simultaneously the networks will grow and make bridges to other networks.

     

    Read more and watch the conference here

  • The Reading Corner: Gabriel Kuri

    The Reading Corner: Gabriel Kuri

    On the occasion of his first institutional exhibition in Germany, Gabriel Kuri created four new groups of works, which provide an insight into different aspects of his practice. Accordingly, Kuri is showing sculptures and installation; all of them are made out of found materials or industrially manufactured products, including marble slabs, sand, paper, cigarette butts, or body care products.

     

    A precise and deliberate positioning and a surprising casualness always characterize the presentation of his objects in the exhibition. With their humor and lightness of touch, his works level criticism as well as political, economic, and social conditions. In the sense of an extended notion of sculpture, he shifts the boundaries of art and the everyday, as the viewers and the everyday become part of the aesthetic form.⁠

     

    This catalogue is published on the occasion of Gabriel Kuri’s solo exhibition at Bielefelder Kunstverein and Kunstverein Freiburg⁠. 

     

    Available here!

  • Messages from Home – Jean-Pascal Flavien

    Messages from Home – Jean-Pascal Flavien

    Under the heading Messages from Home artists are sharing videos from their (temporary) studios or homes.⁠

    Here, Jean-Pascal Flavien presents fostering architecture. Deep green, his model of "Greenhouse" has a striking floor plan that, seen from above, is reminiscent of a plant from which four limbs extend.⁠

     

    Click the image to watch the full video!

  • Behind the Scenes – Jac Leirner

    Behind the Scenes – Jac Leirner

    Jac Leirner has been working from her home in Sao Paulo on a new body of work. Fascinated by often overlooked objects and materials, she recently embraced pens from museums, airlines, and hotels, which had been left aside until the last couple of weeks, creating humorous and peculiar sculptures. Clay forms the base of several of these new pieces and is embedded with pen tops, springs, and cartridges.

     

    Here, Jac reminds us that there are inherent, magical qualities even in the most seemingly banal of materials. Along with artist Adriano Costa, the #quarantineshow project was launched on Instagram, and every single day they each post a new work. Follow Jac Leirner (@jacleirner) and Adriano Costa (@adrianocostaluis) to visit their everyday #quarentineshow

  • Letter from Berlin – April 9, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – April 9, 2020

    Exhibition view: Liam Gillick, McNamara, Schipper & Krome, Cologne, 1994
    Photo © Lothar Schnepf

     

    This week we are inaugurating several new features on our website.
    Continuity, our new digital platform, features a variety of news, messages and online stories by our artists and the gallery staff. It also hosts our weekly e-mailing, Letter from Berlin.


    We have added Selected Works section to each artist’s page on our website. It gives an overview of major works, spanning throughout the entire careers of the represented artists.

    A separate section integrates of all historical exhibitions at Johnen Galerie since 2004. In the course of last year’s thirtieth anniversary of the gallery’s founding in Cologne in 1989, extensive archive material was published on the gallery’s website. The online-accessible exhibition history documents over 230 internal gallery and countless external institutional exhibitions.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

  • Journey Through the Gallery – General Idea, ¥en Boutique

     Journey Through the Gallery – General Idea, ¥en Boutique

    On the occasion of the re-launch of our website with extensive archive material celebrating over 230 exhibitions in 30 years, over the next weeks we will be sharing archival material from some of our past exhibitions!⁠

     

    To begin, we're starting with General Idea's ¥en Boutique exhibition from 1989.⁠

     

    Under the guise of pseudonyms, 3 Canadian artists called AA Bronson, Felix Partz and Jorge Zontal work together in the group 'General Idea'.

     

    Read more here

     

  • Online Tour – Liu Ye, Storytelling

    Online Tour – Liu Ye, Storytelling

    The Fondazione Prada has produced a walk-through of Liu Ye’s exhibition entitled Storytelling with an engaging and thoughtful commentary by the artist and the curator Udo Kittelmann. Following the first iteration held in 2018 at Prada Rong Zhai in Shanghai, Liu Ye's solo exhibition in Milan features a selection of 35 paintings realized from 1992 onwards.

     

    The exhibition is currently closed but scheduled to remain on view through September 28, 2020.

     

    Click the image to see inside the exhibition

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.2

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.2

    Welcome to the second instalment of our new series where our artists open their studio doors and invite you to guess whose studio.⁠

     

    To give a helping hand to figure out whose studio you’re peeking into, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track: 

     

    1. Kids are frequent inspiration⁠

    2. Plants have been art too⁠

    3. The studio has a proper name⁠

    4. I... I... I…⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • The Reading Corner: OneStar

    The Reading Corner: OneStar

    In a generous gesture of bringing art into life, OneStar has made available pdfs of all their artists’ books published since 2000. We salute them!

     

    Download the books for free here!

  • Messages from Home – Isa Melsheimer

    Messages from Home – Isa Melsheimer

    Under the heading Messages from Home, we are sharing videos from our artists as they open their (temporary) studios and share short messages on how they’re handling these uncertain times.⁠

    This week, Isa Melsheimer takes her plants out for some fresh air and to get some of that springtime sun.

     

    Click the image to watch the full video!

  • Letter from Berlin – April 3, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – April 3, 2020

    "A few years ago, I gave Nathan Carter a short text I had written on his work. He was visiting Berlin for the opening of the gallery’s new space and I was updating his profile. In response he gave me a list that I took as a kind of manifesto. Similar perhaps to the famous Pop Art list by the Independent Group, it is a mission statement, and as he recently noted,

    “It was a defiant list of all the things that I as an artist will play with when I make art. The use of the word “play” means to experiment, touch, examine, alter and use in a fluid active way. The list is a license to be an artist and to make work about all of those things. Consequences n’all.” From abstraction to violence via bad weather, dancing, espionage, excitement, fear, love, pain, punk rock, shame, tequila & guacamole bar, among others—it’s all there.

     

    I came across that list three weeks ago when I was preparing to work from home, and, on a whim, took it with me. It seemed like a good antidote to impending isolation.

     

    The short video Carter sent last week, a behind-the-scenes view of his studio where he is currently working on a new film entitled LA GNARLIES, has a similar exuberance, a defiance of darkness."

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

  • Connections – Gabriel Kuri

    Connections – Gabriel Kuri

    "Looking at the bookshelf across my table I noticed Gabriel Kuri’s catalogue Sorted/Resorted published for his Wiels exhibition. Home office has advantages and disadvantages. As work is for the most part done remotely, on a computer far from the offices, my surroundings have become richer, alive. All the objects collected in more than a decades start to speak again.

     

    I like to listen to these objects – to reconnect with the reality in which I found them. It is something I’ve always liked since I was going to the beach in summer: I found the things people left in the sand very fascinating – especially because they were also completely out of context. It was an idiosyncratic place, a desert land.

     

    When I met Gabriel in 2015 for his most recent solo exhibition at the gallery, this sense of research was activated in the same way. Among the works he made, there was a series of sculptures that were hosting found objects. In the heat of the summer, I was looking for a coffee cup, the one you use to take the coffee with you, and you realize that a plain one, the one that contains just the right sense he was looking for did not exist in Kreuzberg, at least in the surrounding 10 blocks or so of his studio at the time.

     

    This research became a way to map the city and ordering a coffe-to-go was no longer about the taste of the coffee but about the shape of the cup." – Emiliano Pistacchi

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Gabriel Kuri, carbon index compost copy

    Journey Through the Gallery – Gabriel Kuri, carbon index compost copy

     

    In the second installment of our team's favorite exhibitions from the history of the gallery, Andrea Rossetti, photographer and dear friend, speaks about why the 2011 Gabriel Kuri exhibition carbon index compost copy is particularly special to him.⁠

     

    “This was the very first exhibition I documented at Esther Schipper, so I have very special feelings when I think about it and remember the installations and artworks very vividly. It was also the very first show at the Schöneberger Ufer location, and I like the idea that both myself and the gallery have a shared milestone together.”

     

    In carbon index compost copy Gabriel Kuri fused formal and material aspects in a dichotomy of physical shape, object nature, and reduction. The work incorporated a complex combination of minimalist formal language and veiled biographical reference into a very personal and often poetic discourse. Contemporary references of mundane applications, casually dispersed among the work, such as bank notes, plastic bags, official queuing tickets linked his timeless objects to the contemporary universe as well as creating a critical reference to current value systems.

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Guess Whose Studio Pt.1

    Guess Whose Studio Pt.1

    A paintbrush, a camera, a robot, disregarded doorstops or even a ouija board – how much can you tell from an artist by what’s in their studio? We’re putting your knowledge to the test in this new series where our artists open the doors and invite you to work out whose studio you’re peering into…⁠

     

    To help you out, we’ve put together a number of clues to get you on the right track.

     

    1. Carp skeletons have featured in work in past.

    2. A lot of stretching is done here

    3. Lives in Germany⁠

    4. Recent fondness for the color grey⁠

     

    Click here to find out the answer!

  • Behind the Scenes – Nathan Carter

    Behind the Scenes – Nathan Carter

    A behind the scenes look into Nathan Carter’s new film, LA GNARLIES, which features surfing & skating, a magic quesadilla and an infamous Haggis Monster…

     

    “The video shows the scene in my studio and my workspace at home where I am currently making the images and music for my next film called LA GNARLIES. Using hand painted paper cutouts and dioramas and music made in a dirty Brooklyn basement, the film tells the story of four women from Ventura California who, depending on the waves either surf or skate. One day they eat a magic quesadilla and get teleported to Thurso Scotland where they must defeat the infamous Haggis Monster in order to re-enter the Tesseract Portal and teleport back home on a giant wave to sunny California. " – Nathan Carter

     

    Click the image to watch the full video!

  • Messages from Home – Christoph Keller

    Messages from Home – Christoph Keller

    Under the heading Messages from Home, we are sharing videos from our artists as they open their (temporary) studios and share short messages on how they’re handling these uncertain times.⁠

    This week Christoph Keller shares this playful DIY starter-kit on how to make a mask.

     

    Click the image to watch the full video!

  • Online Tour – Isa Melsheimer

    Online Tour – Isa Melsheimer

    An exclusive behind the scene tour while the exhibition is closed due to the temporary closure of KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art, Berlin.

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Letter from Berlin – March 27, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – March 27, 2020

    Isa Melsheimer’s works are quite fun to unpack: clusters of far-reaching associations--personal, literary, historical, philosophical, architectural—are massed into their intense materiality, as unexpected details pop out and demand an immediate response which can include curiosity, disbelief, laughter—and even a bit anxiety when the works are colossal mountains made of shards of glass.

     

    This is why my virtual visit will focus on a few works: heaping the detailed references onto each of them undermines the artist’s light touch, the playful arrangement she has created at the KINDL. The references—which building is cited and why—and, many more views and close-ups of details can be found in our dedicated Online Viewing Room.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here.

  • Messages from Home – Anri Sala

    Messages from Home – Anri Sala

    In times like these it’s never felt more important to stay connected with one another. With this in mind, we’ve asked our artists to share short messages on how they’re handling these uncertain times.⁠

    First to share is Anri Sala, who sent a message juxtaposing the closeness and remoteness between all of us right now. Based on the idea of a prolonged “life line” by using protection, it hints at social distancing as well as nodding to previous works by Sala.⁠

     

    Click the image to watch the full video!

  • Journey Through the Gallery – Pierre Huyghe, Influants

    Journey Through the Gallery – Pierre Huyghe, Influants

    Exhibition view: Pierre Huyghe, Influants, Esther Schipper, Berlin, 2011⁠⠀
    © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020⁠
    Photos © Andrea Rossetti

     

    We’d like to take you on a journey through the history of the gallery.

     

    Each week we will be sharing moments from Esther Schipper’s 30 year history that are personal favourites from the team. Founded in in Cologne in 1989, the gallery celebrated its 30th anniversary last year, and to mark this occasion we have relaunched our website with extensive archive material, celebrating over 230 exhibitions in 30 years.

     

    The first to be featured is, Pierre Huyghe’s 2011 Influants, chosen by Marek Obara, Associate Director. “It was an exhibition constructed of seemingly simple means, but at the same time related the inside to the outside within the context of an exhibition.⁠"

     

    See inside the exhibition here

  • Letter from Berlin – March 20, 2020

    Letter from Berlin – March 20, 2020

    Daniel Steegmann Mangrané in his exhibition Fog Dog, 2020

     

    By now a tenuous routine begins to set in and many of us may very well begin to miss our outings into the world of art and ideas. To give respite to the unsettling onslaught of coronavirus news we want to visit exhibitions with you. If you cannot come in person, we will accompany you on virtual tours. In the Letter from Berlin we will bring you stories about exhibitions, our artists, about works that have touched us, hidden gems and all-time favourites of our team.

     

    For our first Letter From Berlin, our Head of Content Isabelle Moffat takes you into Fog Dog, Daniel Steegmann's exhibition at the gallery. Leah Turner, Director and Artist Liaison remembers her experiences at Art Basel Hong Kong, and we watch the wildly popular K-Pop band BTS disappear in Ann Veronica Janssens' fog room, Green Yellow and Pink, currently installed in Seoul as part of the Connect, BTS project.

     

    Read the entire Letter from Berlin here

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